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Children with Developmental Disorders and Other Special Needs

  • Larry W Desch
  • Paul H. Lipkin
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

In the past half-century in the United States considerable changes have occurred, both in public opinion and legislation, regarding children and adults who have disabilities or special needs. Laws such as the Rehabilitation Act (especially Section 504) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), have led to guarantees of civil rights and protections for people with disabilities.1,2 Important legislation, including the Education for Handicapped Children Act3 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,2 specifically protect children with disabilities.4,5 Many of these laws are still important because of the various rights and entitlements that were established, including access to technology. The Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act6 established consumer-driven service delivery in all states to improve access to “assistive technology devices and services” including information and communication management tools.

The definition of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) has been formalized by both the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and has been nearly universally accepted. CHSCN are “those who have or are at risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally”.7

Keywords

Care Coordination Health Information Technology Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Child With Special Health Care Need Special Health Care 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry W Desch
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paul H. Lipkin
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Illinois-Chicago School of MedicineChicago
  2. 2.Developmental PediatricianAdvocate Health CareOak Lawn
  3. 3.The Kennedy Krieger InstituteThe Johns Hopkins Children's CenterBaltimore

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