Advertisement

Core Pediatric Data

  • Kevin B. Johnson
  • Stuart T. Weinberg
  • George R. Kim
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

The distinguishing characteristic of pediatrics as a unique medical domain is the breadth and depth of human growth and development that it covers. The range and variation in these parameters create many contexts in which clinical and administrative data is collected, interpreted, and used to provide appropriate care: to diagnose, plan, and manage therapy of an individual child's illness, to create relevant and effective care on group and population levels, and to study the needs of child health.

Keywords

Influenza Vaccination Core Data Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Clinical Task National Immunization Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Dombkowski KJ, Leung SW, Clark SJ. Provider attitudes regarding use of an immunization information system to identify children with asthma for influenza vaccination. J Public Health Manage Pract. 2007;13(6):567–571.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ungar WJ, Kozyrskyj A, Paterson M, Ahmad F. Effect of cost-sharing on use of asthma medication in children. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162(2):104–110.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Naessens JM, Ruud KL, Tulledge-Scheitel SM, Stroebel RJ, Cabanela RL. Comparison of provider claims data versus medical records review for assessing provision of adult preventive services. J Ambul Care Manage. 2008;31(2):178–186.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC Website; 2008. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  5. 5.
    National Center for Health Statistics. NCHS Website; 2008. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ nchs/Default.htm. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  6. 6.
    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey; 2006. Available at: http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  7. 7.
    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Hospital Cost and Utilization Project (H-CUP); 2008. Available at: http://www.ahrq.gov/data/hcup/. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  8. 8.
    National Center for Health Statistics. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); 2008. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  9. 9.
    National Center for Health Statistics. National Immunization Survey; 2008. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nis/. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  10. 10.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics System; 2008. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss.htm. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  11. 11.
    US Department of Health and Human Services, US Environmental Protection Agency. The National Children's Study; 2008. Available at: http://www.nationalchildrensstudy.gov/. Accessed April 22, 2008.
  12. 12.
    Vermont Oxford Network. VON Website; 2008. Available at: http://www.vtoxford.org/. Accessed April 2008.
  13. 13.
    Tepas JJ 3rd. The national pediatric trauma registry: a legacy of commitment to control of childhood injury. Semin Pediatr Surg. 2004;13(2):126–132.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hammarstedt R, Bulger D. Performance improvement: a “left brain meets right brain” approach. Healthc Financ Manage. 2006;60(12):100–104, 106.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Almenoff JS, Pattishall EN, Gibbs TG, DuMouchel W, Evans SJ, Yuen N. Novel statistical tools for monitoring the safety of marketed drugs. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2007;82(2):157–166.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Barrett JS, Mondick JT, Narayan M, Vijayakumar K, Vijayakumar S. Integration of modeling and simulation into hospital-based decision support systems guiding pediatric pharmaco-therapy. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2008;28;8:6.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Berner ES, Moss J. Informatics challenges for the impending patient information explosion. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2005;12(6):614–617.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin B. Johnson
    • Stuart T. Weinberg
      • 1
    • George R. Kim
      1. 1.Biomedical Informatics and PediatricsVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashville

      Personalised recommendations