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Device Interfaces

  • Melvin I. Reynolds
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

The focus of this chapter is medical device interfaces in the context of anesthesia service delivery, including a discussion of some of the business, clinical, and technical issues and constraints that have applied in the past and are likely to continue to impose themselves in the future. Device data interfaces designed and used exclusively for single-vendor communications are not discussed because many such interfaces are closed and proprietary, and to use them, a customer must access a proprietary black box.

Keywords

Medical Device International Standard Organization Controller Area Network International Electrotechnical Commission Device Interface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melvin I. Reynolds
    • 1
  1. 1.MIScTMBCS AMS Consulting

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