Advertisement

Spontaneous Pathology of Baboons

  • Gene B. Hubbard
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

This chapter is written as a practical guide for individuals who plan to use, or are caring for baboons maintained for biomedical research or other endeavors, and want to become familiar with the basic spontaneous pathology of the baboon. It is not meant to be a complete literature review, but it covers essentially all pertinent pathology and baseline information relating to pathology of the baboon, which is likely to be important to individuals working with baboons. While the baboon is gaining popularity in biomedical research, and abundant baseline and disease information are available, the baboon is not generally as well-defined pathologically as are other more commonly used nonhuman primates (NHPs). Nevertheless, it is impractical to discuss all spontaneous pathology in the baboon thoroughly in this chapter; however, excellent general reference texts are available, as well as more specific texts on parasitology, anatomy, and neoplasia (Table 3.1).

Keywords

Nonhuman Primate Trypanosoma Cruzi Calcium Pyrophosphate Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Aiello, S. E., and Mays, A. (eds.). (1998). The Merck Veterinary Manual (8th ed.). Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station.Google Scholar
  2. Al-Doory, Y. (1965). Microbiological parameters of the baboon (Papio sp.): Mycology. In: Vagtborg, H. (ed.), The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. II. University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 731–739.Google Scholar
  3. Aldridge, K. V. (1997). Seroepidemiology of a novel Babesia spp. in U.S. primate colonies. [Thesis]. University of Washington, Seattle, USA.Google Scholar
  4. Allan, J. S., Leland, M., Broussard, S., Mone, J., and Hubbard, G. (2001). Simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLVs) and lymphomas in African nonhuman primates. Cancer Invest. 19:383–395.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Anderson, R. C. (1992). Nematode Parasites of Vertebrates: Their Development and Transmission. CAB International, Wallingford.Google Scholar
  6. Arganaraz, E. R., Hubbard, G. B., Ramos, L. A., Ford, A. L., Nitz, N., Leland, M. M., VandeBerg, J. L., and Teixeira, A. R. L. (2001). Blood-sucking lice may disseminate Trypanosoma cruzi infection in baboons. Rev. Inst. Med. Trop. Sao Paulo 43:271–276.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Barrier, B. F., Malinowski, M. J., Dick, E. J., Jr., Hubbard, G. B., and Bates, G. W. (2004). Adenomyosis in the baboon is associated with primary infertility. Fertil. Steril. 82(Suppl. 3): 1091–1094.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Barrier, B., Dick, E., Butler, S., and Hubbard, G. (2007). Endometriosis involving the ileocecal junction with regional lymph node involvement in the baboon: A first report and striking pathological finding identical between the human and the baboon. Hum. Reprod. 22:1714–1717.Google Scholar
  9. Baskin, G. B. (2002). Pathology of Nonhuman Primates. Charles Louis Davis, D.V.M. Foundation, Publisher, Gurnee, pp. 1–65.Google Scholar
  10. Baskin, G. B., and Hubbard, G. B. (1980). Ameloblastic odontoma in a baboon (Papio anubis). Vet. Pathol. 17:100–102.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Beehner, J. C., Nguyen, N., Wango, E. O., Alberts, S. C., and Altmann, J. (2006). The endocrinology of pregnancy and fetal loss in wild baboons. Horm. Behav. 49:688–699.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Bellini, S., Hubbard, G. B., and Kaufman, L. (1991). Spontaneous fatal coccidioidomycosis in a native born hybrid baboon (Papio cynocephalus anubis/Papio cynocephalus cynocephalus). Lab. Anim. Sci. 41:509–511.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Beniashvili, D. Sh. (1989). An overview of the world literature on spontaneous tumors in nonhuman primates. J. Med. Primatol. 18:423–437.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Beniashvili, D. Sh. (1994). Experimental Tumors in Monkeys. CRC Press, Boca Raton.Google Scholar
  15. Benirschke, K. (ed.). (1986). Primates: The Road to Self-Sustaining Populations. Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  16. Benirschke, K., Garner, F. M., and Jones, T. C. (eds.). (1978a). Pathology of Laboratory Animals, Vol. I. Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  17. Benirschke, K., Garner, F. M., and Jones, T. C. (eds.). (1978b). Pathology of Laboratory Animals, Vol. II. Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  18. Bennett, B. T., Abee, C. R., and Henrickson, R. (eds.). (1998). Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases. Academic Press, San Diego.Google Scholar
  19. Bernacky, B. J., Gibson, S. V., Keeling, M .E., and Abee, C. R. (2002). Nonhuman primates. In: Laboratory Animal Medicine (Chapter 16, 2nd ed.). Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 730–791.Google Scholar
  20. Bielitzki, J. T. (1998). Integumentary system. In: Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases (Chapter 9). Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 363–375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Bronsdon, M. A., Homer, M. J., Magera, J. M. H., Harrison, C., Andrews, R. G., Bielitzki, J. T., Emerson, C. L., Persing, D. H., and Fritsche, T. R. (1999). Detection of enzootic babesiosis in baboons (Papio cynocephalus) and phylogenetic evidence supporting synonymy of the genera Entopolypoides and Babesia. J. Clin. Microbiol. 37:1548–1553.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Bruestle, M. E., Golden, J. G., Hall, A., III, and Banknieder, A. R. (1981). Naturally occurring Yaba tumor in a baboon (Papio papio). Lab. Anim. Sci. 31:292–294.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Butler, T. M., and Haines, R. J. Jr. (1987). Gastric trichobezoar in a baboon. Lab. Anim. Sci. 37:232–233.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Butler, T. M., and Wiley, G. L. (1971). Baseline values for adult baboon cerebrospinal fluid. Lab. Anim. Sci. 21:123–124.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Butler, T. M., Rosenberg, D. P., Gleiser, C. A., and Goodwin, W. J. (1987). Spontaneous hydrocephalus in baboons. Lab. Anim. Sci. 37:492–493.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Cary, M. E., Suarez-Chavez, M., Wolf, R. F., Kosanke, S. D., and White, G. L. (2006). Jejunal intussusception and small bowel transmural infarction in a baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis). J. Am. Assoc. Lab. Anim. Sci. 45:41–44.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Chaffanjon, P. C., Kenyon, N. M., Ricordi, C., and Kenyon, N. S. (2005). Omental anatomy of non-human primates. Surg. Radiol. Anat. 27:287–291.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Cianciolo, R. E., and Hubbard, G. B. (2005). A review of spontaneous neoplasia in baboons (Papio spp.). J. Med. Primatol. 34:51–66.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Cianciolo, R. E., Butler, S. D., Eggers, J. S., Dick, E. J., Jr., Leland, M. M., de la Garza, M., Brasky, K. M., Cummins L. B., and Hubbard, G. B. (2007). Spontaneous neoplasia in the baboon (Papio spp.). J. Med. Primatol. 36:61–79.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Cissik, J. H., Hankins, G. D., Hauth, J. C., and Kuehl, T. J. (1986). Blood gas, cardiopulmonary, and urine electrolyte reference values in the pregnant yellow baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Am. J. Primatol. 11:277–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Cohen, J. I., Davenport, D. S., Stewart, J. A., Deitchman, S., Hilliard, J. K., Chapman, L. E., and the B Virus Working Group (2002). Recommendations for prevention of and therapy for exposure to B virus (Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 1). Clin. Infect. Dis. 35:1191–1203.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Comuzzie, A. G., Cole, S. A., Martin, L., Carey, K. D., Mahaney, M. C., Blangero, J., and VandeBerg, J. L. (2003). The baboon as a nonhuman primate model for the study of the genetics of obesity. Obes. Res. 11:75–80.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Cox, L. A., Nijland, M. J., Gilbert, J. S., Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E., Hubbard, G. B., McDonald, T. J., Shade, R. E., and Nathanielsz, P. W. (2006a). Effect of 30 percent maternal nutrient restriction from 0.16 to 0.5 gestation on fetal baboon kidney gene expression. J. Physiol. 572:67–85.Google Scholar
  34. Cox, L. A., Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N., Hubbard, G. B., Nijland, M. J., McDonald, T. J., and Nathanielsz, P. W. (2006b). Gene expression profile differences in left and right liver lobes from mid-gestation fetal baboons: A cautionary tale. J. Physiol. 572(Pt 1):59–66.Google Scholar
  35. Cusick, P. K., and Morgan, S. J. (1998). Nervous system. In: Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases (Chapter 12). Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 461–483.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. D’Hooghe, T. M. (1997). Clinical relevance of the baboon as a model for the study of endometriosis. Fertil. Steril. 68:613–625.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Dick, E. J., Jr., Hubbard, G. B., Martin, L. J., and Leland, M. M. (2003). Record review of baboons with histologically confirmed endometriosis in a large established colony. J. Med. Primatol. 32:39–47.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Dudley, C. J., Hubbard, G. B., Moore, C. M., Dunn, B. G., Raveendran, M., Rogers, J., Nathanielsz, P. W., McCarrey, J. R., and Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E. (2006). A male baboon (Papio hamadryas) with a mosaic 43, XXXY/42, XY karyotype. Am. J. Med. Genet. A. 140:94–97.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  39. Duncan, R., Murthy, F. A., and Mirkovic, R. R. (1995). Characterization of a novel syncytium-inducing baboon reovirus. Virology 212:752–756.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Eberle, R., and Hilliard, J. (1995). The simian herpesviruses. Infect. Agents Dis. 4:55–70.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  41. Eberle, R., Black, D. H., Blewett, E. L., and White, G. L. (1997). Prevalence of Herpesvirus papio 2 in baboons and identification of immunogenic viral peptides. Lab. Anim. Sci. 47:256–262.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  42. Eugster, A. K., Kalter, S. S., Kim, C. S., and Pinkerton, M. E. (1969). Isolation of adenoviruses from baboons (Papio sp.) with respiratory and enteric infections. Arch. Gesamte Virusforsch. 26:260–270.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Fazleabas, A. T., Brudney, A., Chai, D., and Mwenda, J. (2004). Endometriosis in the baboon. Gynecol. Obstet. Invest. 57:46–47.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  44. Flynn, R. J. (1973). Parasites of Laboratory Animals. The Iowa State University Press, Ames.Google Scholar
  45. Fourie, P. B., and Odendaal, M. W. (1983). Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a closed colony of baboons (Papio ursinus). Lab. Anim. 17:125–128.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Fowler, M. E. (ed.). (1993). Zoo & Wild Animal Medicine: Current Therapy (3rd ed.). W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  47. Fox, J. G., Anderson, L. C., Loew, F. M., and Quimby, F. W. (eds.). (2002). Laboratory Animal Medicine (2nd ed.). Academic Press, San Diego.Google Scholar
  48. Frost, P. A., Hubbard, G. B., Dammann, M. J., Snider, C. L., Moore, C. M., Hodara, V. L., Giavedoni, L. D., Rohwer, R., Mahaney, M. C., Butler, T. M., Cummins, L. B., McDonald, T. J., Nathanielsz, P. W., and Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E. (2004). White monkey syndrome in infant baboons (Papio species). J. Med. Primatol. 33:197–213.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Giavedoni, L. D., Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N., Hodara, V. L., Parodi, L. M., Hubbard, G. B., Dudley, D. J., McDonald, T. J., and Nathanielsz, P. W. (2004). Phenotypic changes associated with advancing gestation in maternal and fetal baboon lymphocytes. J. Reprod. Immunol. 64:121–132.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Gibson, S. V. (1998). Bacterial and mycotic diseases. In: Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases (Chapter 2). Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 59–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Gillman, J., and Gilbert, C. (1955). Primary amyloidosis in the baboon (Papio ursinus): Its relationship to macromolecular syndromes and diseases of the connective tissues. Acta Med. Scand. 152(Suppl. 360):155–189.Google Scholar
  52. Gleiser, C. A., Yaeger, R. G., and Ghidoni, J. J. (1986). Trypanosoma cruzi infection in a colony-born baboon. JAVMA 189:1225–1226.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  53. Glover, E. J., Leland, M., Dick, E. J., Jr., Hubbard, G. B. (in press). Gastroesophageal reflux disease in baboons (Papio sp.): A new animal model. J. Med. Primatol. Google Scholar
  54. Goens, S. D., Moore, C. M., Brasky, K. M., Frost, P. A., Leland, M. M., and Hubbard, G. B. (2005). Nephroblastomatosis and nephroblastoma in nonhuman primates. J. Med. Primatol. 34:165–170.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Goncharova, N. D., and Lapin, B. A. (2004). Age-related endocrine dysfunction in nonhuman primates. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 1019:321–325.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Goodwin, W. J., Haines, R. J., and Bernal, J. C. (1987). Tetanus in baboons of a corral breeding colony. Lab. Anim. Sci. 37:231–232.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  57. Gurll, N., and DenBesten, L. (1978). Animal models of human cholesterol gallstone disease: A review. Lab. Anim. Sci. 28:428–432.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  58. Hainsey, B. M., Hubbard, G. B., Leland, M. M., and Brasky, K. M. (1993). Clinical parameters of the normal baboons (Papio species) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Lab. Anim. Sci. 43:236–243.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  59. Harewood, W. J., Gillin, A., Hennessy, A., Armistead, J., Horvath, J. S., and Tiller, D. J. (1999). Biochemistry and haematology values for the baboon (Papio hamadryas): The effects of sex, growth, development and age. J. Med. Primatol. 28:19–31.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  60. Harewood, W. J., Gillin, A., Hennessy, A., Armistead, J., Horvath, J. S., and Tiller, D. J. (2000). The effects of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and early lactation on haematology and plasma biochemistry in the baboon (Papio hamadryas). J. Med. Primatol. 29:415–420.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Havill, L. M., Snider, C. L., Leland, M. M., Hubbard, G. B., Theriot, S. R., and Mahaney, M. C. (2003). Hematology and blood biochemistry in infant baboons (Papio hamadryas). J. Med. Primatol. 32:131–138.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Havill, L. M., Hale, L. G., Newman, D. E., Witte, S. M., and Mahaney, M. C. (2006). Bone ALP and OC reference standards in adult baboons (Papio hamadryas) by sex and age. J. Med. Primatol. 35:97–105.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Hird, D. W., Anderson, J. H., and Bielitzki, J. T. (1984). Diarrhea in nonhuman primates: A survey of primate colonies for incidence rates and clinical opinion. Lab. Anim. Sci. 34:465–470.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  64. Hof, P. R., Gilissen, E. P., Sherwood, C. C., Duan, H., Lee, P. W. H., Delman, B. N., Naidich, T. P., Gannon, P. J., Perl, D. P., and Erwin, J. M. (2002). Comparative neuropathology of brain aging in primates. In: Erwin, J. M. and Hof, P. R. (eds.), Aging in Nonhuman Primates. Basel, Karger, pp. 130–154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Hope, K., Goldsmith, M. L., and Graczyk, T. (2004). Parasitic health of olive baboons in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. Vet. Parasitol. 122:165–170.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Howell, K. H., Hubbard, G. B., Moore, C. M., Dunn, B. G., von Kap-Herr, C., Raveendran, M., Rogers, J. A., Leland, M. M., Brasky, K. M., Nathanielsz, P. W., and Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E. (2006). Trisomy of chromosome 18 in the baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis). Cytogenet. Genome Res. 112:76–81.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Hubbard, G. B. (1995). Protozoal diseases of nonhuman primates. Semin. Avian Exotic Pet Med. 4:145–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Hubbard, G. B. (2001). Nonhuman primate dermatology. Vet. Clin. North Am. Exotic Anim. Pract. 4:573–583.Google Scholar
  69. Hubbard, G. B., Soike, K. F., Butler, T. M., Carey, K. D., Davis, H., Butcher, W. I., and Gauntt, C. J. (1992). An encephalomyocarditis virus epizootic in a baboon colony. Lab. Anim. Sci. 42:233–239.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  70. Hubbard, G. B., Moné, J. P., Allan, J. S., Davis, K. J., III, Leland, M. M., Banks, P. M., and Smir, B. (1993a). Spontaneously generated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in twenty-seven simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 antibody-positive baboons (Papio species). Lab. Anim. Sci. 43:301–309.Google Scholar
  71. Hubbard, G. B., Gardiner, C. H., Bellini, S., Ehler, W. J., Conn, D. B., and King, M. M. (1993b). Mesocestoides infection in captive olive baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis). Lab. Anim. Sci. 43:625–627.Google Scholar
  72. Hubbard, G. B., Steele, K. E., Davis, K. J., III, and Leland, M. M. (2002). Spontaneous pancreatic islet amyloidosis in 40 baboons. J. Med. Primatol. 31:84–90.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Jones, T. C., Mohr, U., and Hunt, R. D. (eds.). (1993). Nonhuman Primates, Vol. II. Springer-Verlag, New York.Google Scholar
  74. Kalter, S. S., Ratner, J. J., Rodriguez, A. R., and Kalter, G. V. (1965). Microbiological parameters of the baboon (Papio sp.): Virology. In: Vagtborg, H. (ed.), The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. II. University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 757–773.Google Scholar
  75. Kalter, S. S., Heberling, R. L., Cooke, A. W., Barry, J. D., Tian, P. Y., and Northam, W. J. (1997). Viral infections of nonhuman primates. Lab. Anim. Sci. 47:461–467.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  76. Kettner, M., Willwohl, D., Hubbard, G. B., Rub, U., Dick, E. J., Jr., Cox, A. B., Trottier, Y., Auburger, G., Braak, H., and Schultz, C. (2002). Intranuclear aggregation of nonexpanded ataxin-3 in marinesco bodies of the nonhuman primate substantia nigra. Exp. Neurol. 176:117–121.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Kim, J. C. S., and Kalter, S. S. (1975). Pathology of pulmonary acariasis in baboons (Papio sp.). J. Med. Primatol. 4:70–82.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  78. Kuntz, R. E., and Myers, B. J. (1965). Microbiological parameters of the baboon (Papio sp.): Parasitology. In: Vagtborg, H. (ed.), The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. II. University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 741–755.Google Scholar
  79. Kumar, V., Abul, K. A., and Nelson, F. (2005). Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease (7th ed.). W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  80. Legesse, M., and Erko, B. (2004). Zoonotic intestinal parasites in Papio anubis (baboon) and Cercopithecus aethiops (vervet) from four localities in Ethiopia. Acta Trop. 90:231–236.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Leland, M. M., Hubbard, G. B., Sentmore, H. T., III, Soike, K. F., and Hilliard, J. K. (2000). Outbreak of Orthoreovirus-induced meningoencephalomyelitis in baboons. Comp. Med. 50: 199–205.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  82. Leszczynski, J. K., Danahey, D. G., Ferrer, K. T., Hewett, T. A., and Fortman, J. D. (2002). Primary hyperparathyroidism in an adult female olive baboon (Papio anubis). Comp. Med. 52:563–567.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  83. Levine, N. D. (1985). Veterinary Protozoology. Iowa State University Press, Ames.Google Scholar
  84. Line, A. S. (1998). Environmental hazards. In: Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases (Chapter 5). Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 233–243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Lowenstine, L. J. (1986). Neoplasms and proliferative disorders in nonhuman primates. In: Benirschke, K. (ed.), Primates: The Road to Self-sustaining Populations. Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 782–814.Google Scholar
  86. Lowenstine, L. J., and Lerche, N. W. (1993) Nonhuman primate retroviruses and simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In: Fowler, M. E. (ed.), Zoo & Wild Animal Medicine: Current Therapy 3. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, pp. 373–378.Google Scholar
  87. Mackie, J. T., and O’Rourke, J. L. (2003). Gastritis associated with Helicobacter-like organisms in baboons. Vet. Pathol. 40:563–566.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Mahaney, M. C., Leland, M. M., Williams-Blangero, S., and Marinez, Y. N. (1993a). Cross-sectional growth standards for captive baboons: I. Organ weight by chronological age. J. Med. Primatol. 22:400–414.Google Scholar
  89. Mahaney, M. C., Leland, M. M., Williams-Blangero, S., and Marinez, Y. N. (1993b). Cross-sectional growth standards for captive baboons: II. Organ weight by body weight. J. Med. Primatol. 22:415–427.Google Scholar
  90. Mahaney, M. C., Brugnara, C., Lease, L. R., and Platt, O. S. (2005). Genetic influences on peripheral blood cell counts: A study in baboons. Blood 106:1210–1214.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. Martino, M. A., Hubbard, G. B., Butler, T. M., and Hilliard, J. K. (1998). Clinical disease associated with simian agent 8 infection in the baboon. Lab. Anim. Sci. 48:18–22.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  92. Martino, M., Hubbard, G. B., and Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. (2007). Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) in a pregnant baboon (Papio cynocephalus). J. Med. Primatol. 36:108–112.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Mattson, J. A., Kuehl, T. J., Yandell, P. M., Pierce, L. M., and Coates, K. W. (2005). Evaluation of the aged female baboon as a model of pelvic organ prolapse and pelvic reconstructive surgery. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 192:1395–1398.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. McClure, H. M., Brodie, A. R., Anderson, D. C., and Swenson, R. B. (1986). Bacterial infections of nonhuman primates. In: Benirschke, K. (ed.), Primates: The Road to Self-sustaining Populations. Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 531–556.Google Scholar
  95. McConnell, E. E., Basson, P. A., De Vos, V., Myers, B. J., and Kuntz, R. E. (1974). A survey of diseases among 100 free-ranging baboons (Papio ursinus) from the Kruger National Park. Onderstepport J. Vet. Res. 41:97–168.Google Scholar
  96. Mendelow, B., Grobicki, D., de la Hunt, M., Marcus, F., and Metz, J. (1980). Normal cellular and humoral immunologic parameters in the baboon (Papio ursinus) compared to human standards. Lab. Anim. Sci. 30:1018–1021.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  97. Migaki, G., Hubbard, G. B., and Butler, T. M. (1993). Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii infection, baboon. In: Jones, T. C., Mohr, U., and Hunt, R. D. (eds.), Nonhuman Primates II. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 19–23.Google Scholar
  98. Moor-Jankowski, J., Huser, H. J., Wiener, A. S., Kalter, S. S., Pallotta, A. J., and Guthrie, C. B. (1965). Hematology, blood groups, serum isoantigens, and preservation of blood of the baboon. In: Vagtborg, H. (ed.), The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the First International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. I. University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 363–405.Google Scholar
  99. Moore, C. M., McKeand, J., Witte, S. M., Hubbard, G. B., Rogers, J., and Leland, M. M. (1998). Teratoma with trisomy 16 in a baboon (Papio hamadryas). Am. J. Primatol. 46:323–332.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Moore, C. M., Hubbard, G. B., Leland, M. M., Dunn, B. G., and Best, R. G. (2003). Spontaneous ovarian tumors in twelve baboons: A review of ovarian neoplasms in non-human primates. J. Med. Primatol. 32:48–56.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Moore, C. M., Hubbard, G. B., Leland, M. M., Dunn, B. G., Barrier, B. F., Siler-Khodr, T. M., and Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E. (2006). Primary amenorrhea associated with ovarian leiomyoma in a baboon (Papio hamadryas). J. Am. Assoc. Lab. Anim. Sci. 45:58–62.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  102. Moore, C. M., Hubbard, G. B., Dick, E., Dunn, B. G., Raveendran, M., Rogers, J., Williams, V., Gomez, J. J., Butler, S. D., Leland, M. M., and Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E. (in press). Trisomy 17 in a baboon (Papio hamadryas) with polydactyly, patent foramen ovale and pyelectasis. Am. J. Primatol. Google Scholar
  103. Morrow, A. C., and Terry, M. W. (1972). Liver function tests in blood of nonhuman primates tabulated from the literature. Primate Information Center. University of Washington, 22 pp.Google Scholar
  104. Müller-Graf, C. D. M., Collins, D. A., Packer, C., and Woolhouse, M. E. J. (1997). Schistosoma mansoni infection in a natural population of olive baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) in Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania. Parasitology 115:621–627.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Mwenda, J. M., Nyachieo, A., Langat, D. K., and Steele, D. A. (2005). Serological detection of adenoviruses in non-human primates maintained in a colony in Kenya. East Afr. Med. J. 82:371–375.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  106. Nobrega-Lee, M., Hubbard, G., Gardiner, C. H., LoVerde, P., Carvalho-Queiroz, C., Conn, D. B., Rohde, K., Dick, E. J., Jr., Nathanielsz, P., Martin, D., Siler-Khodr, T., and Schlabrtiz-Loutsevitch, N. (2007). Sparganosis in wild caught baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis). J. Med. Primatol. 36:47–54.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  107. Ott-Joslin, J. E. (1993). Zoonotic diseases of nonhuman primates. In: Fowler, M. E. (ed.), Zoo & Wild Animal Medicine: Current Therapy 3. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, pp. 358–373.Google Scholar
  108. Phillips-Conroy, J. E., Jolly, C. J., and Rogers, J. (1987). Hematocrits of free-ranging baboons: Variation within and among populations. J. Med. Primatol. 16:389–402.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  109. Platenberg, R. C., Hubbard, G. B., Ehler, W. J., and Hixson, C. J. (2001). Spontaneous disc degeneration in the baboon model: Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic correlation. J. Med. Primatol. 30:268–272.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. Poole, T. (ed.). (1999). The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals (7th ed., Vol. 1): Terrestrial Vertebrates. Blackwell Science Ltd., Oxford.Google Scholar
  111. Porter, B. F., Summers, B. A., Leland, M. M., and Hubbard, G. B. (2004). Glioblastoma multiforme in three baboons (Papio spp.). Vet. Pathol. 41:424–428.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Rodriguez, A. R., Kalter, S. S., Heberling, R. L., Helmke, R. J., and Guajardo, J. E. (1977). Viral infections of the captive Kenya baboon (Papio cynocephalus): A five-year epidemiologic study of an outdoor colony. Lab. Anim. Sci. 27:356–371.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  113. Rubio, C. A., and Hubbard, G. (1996). Hyperplastic foveolar gastropathy and hyperplastic foveolar gastritis in baboons. In Vivo 10:507–510.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  114. Rubio, C. A., and Hubbard, G. B. (1998). Adenocarcinoma of the cecum with Crohn’s-like features in baboons. Anticancer Res. 18:1143–1148.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  115. Rubio, C. A., and Hubbard, G. B. (2000). Cryptal lymphocytic colitis: A new entity in baboons. In Vivo 14:485–486.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  116. Rubio, C. A., and Hubbard, G. B. (2001). Chronic colitis in baboons: Similarities with chronic colitis in humans. In Vivo 15:109–116.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  117. Ruch, T. C. (1959). Disease of Laboratory Primates. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  118. Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E., Hubbard, G. B., Dammann, M. J., Jenkins, S. L., Frost, P. A., McDonald, T. J., and Nathanielsz, P. W. (2004a). Normal concentrations of essential and toxic elements in pregnant baboons and fetuses (Papio species). J. Med. Primatol. 33:152–162.Google Scholar
  119. Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E., Hubbard, G. B., Frost, P. A., Cummins, L. B., Dick, E. J., Jr., Nathanielsz, P. W., and McDonald, T. J. (2004b). Abdominal pregnancy in a baboon: A first case report. J. Med. Primatol. 33:55–59.Google Scholar
  120. Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E., Hubbard, G. B., Jenkins, S. L., Martin, H. C., Snider, C. S., Frost, P. A., Leland, M. M., Havill, L. M., McDonald, T. J., and Nathanielsz, P. W. (2005). Ontogeny of hematological cell and biochemical profiles in maternal and fetal baboons (Papio species). J. Med. Primatol. 34:193–200.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Schmidt, R. E. (1971). Ophthalmic lesions in non-human primates. Vet. Path. 8:28–36.Google Scholar
  122. Schultz, C., del Tredici, K., Rüb, U., Braak, E., Hubbard, G. B., and Braak, H. (2002). The brain of the aging baboon: A nonhuman primate model for neuronal and glial tau pathology. In: Erwin, J. M. and Hof, P. R. (eds.), Aging in Nonhuman Primates. Basel, Karger, pp. 118–129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  123. Singleton, W. L., Smikle, C. B., Hankins, G. D. V., Hubbard, G. B., Ehler, W. J., and Brasky, K. B. (1995). Surgical correction of severe vaginal introital stenosis in female baboons (Papio sp.) infected with simian agent 8. Lab. Anim. Sci. 45:628–630.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  124. Socha, W. W. (1993). Blood groups of apes and monkeys. In: Jones, T. C., Mohr, U., and Hunt, R. D. (eds.). Nonhuman Primates II. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 208–215.Google Scholar
  125. Strong, J. P., and McGill, H. C., Jr. (1965). Spontaneous arterial lesions in baboons. In: H. Vagtborg (ed.), The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the First International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. I. The University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 471–483.Google Scholar
  126. Strong, J. P., Miller, J. H., and McGill, H. C., Jr. (1965). Naturally occurring parasitic lesions in baboons. In: Vagtborg, H. (ed.). The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the First International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. I. The University of Texas Press, Austin, pp. 503–512.Google Scholar
  127. Sundberg, J. P., and Reichmann, M. E. (1993). Papillomavirus infections. In: Jones, T. C., Mohr, U., and Hunt, R. D. (eds.), Nonhuman Primates II. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 1–7.Google Scholar
  128. Swindler, D. R., and Wood, C. D. (1973). An Atlas of Primate Gross Anatomy: Baboon, Chimpanzee, and Man. University of Washington Press, Seattle.Google Scholar
  129. Szabo, C. A., Leland, M. M., Knape, K., Elliott, J. J., Haines, V., and Williams, J. T. (2005). Clinical and EEG phenotypes of epilepsy in the baboon (Papio hamadryas spp.). Epilepsy Res. 65:71–80.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  130. Tame, J. D., Winter, J. A., Li, C., Jenkins, S., Giussani, D. A., and Nathanielsz, P. W. (1998). Fetal growth in the baboon during the second half of pregnancy. J. Med. Primatol. 27:234–239.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  131. Tchirikov, M., Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, N. E., Hubbard, G. B., Schroder, H. J., and Nathanielsz, P. W. (2005). Structural evidence for mechanisms to redistribute hepatic and ductus venosus blood flows in nonhuman primate fetuses. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 192:1146–1152.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  132. Toft, J. D., II, and Eberhard, M. L. (1998). Parasitic diseases. In: Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases (Chapter 3). Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 111–205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  133. Vagtborg, H. (ed.). (1965). The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the First International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. I. The University of Texas Press, Austin.Google Scholar
  134. Vagtborg, H. (ed.). (1967). The Baboon in Medical Research. Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on the Baboon and Its Use as an Experimental Animal, Vol. II. The University of Texas Press, Austin.Google Scholar
  135. van der Kuyl, A. C., Dekker, J. T., and Goudsmit, J. (1996). Baboons endogenous virus evolution and ecology. Trends Microbiol. 4:455–459.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  136. Wallach, J. D., and Boever, W. J. (1983). Diseases of Exotic Animals: Medical and Surgical Management. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia.Google Scholar
  137. Weber, H. W., and Greeff, M. J. (1973). Observations on spontaneous pathological lesions in chacma baboons (Papio ursinus). Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 38:407–413.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  138. Weller, R. E. (1998). Neoplasia/proliferative disorders. In: Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical Research: Diseases (Chapter 4). Academic Press, San Diego, pp. 207–232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  139. Willwohl, D., Kettner, M., Braak, H., Hubbard, G. B., Dick, E. J., Jr., Cox, A. B., and Schultz, C. (2002). Pallido-nigral spheroids in nonhuman primates: accumulation of heat shock proteins in astroglial processes. Acta Neuropathol. (Berl). 103:276–280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  140. Wilson, J. G. (1978). Nonhuman primates. In: Benirschke, K., Garner, F. M., and Jones, T. C. (eds.), Pathology of Laboratory Animals, Vol. II. Springer-Verlag, New York, pp. 1911–1946.Google Scholar
  141. Wolf, R. F., Rogers, K. M., Blewett, E. L., Dittmer, D. P., Fakhari, F. D., Hill, C. A., Kosanke, S. D., White, G. L., and Eberle R. (2006). A naturally occurring fatal case of Herpesvirus papio 2 pneumonia in an infant baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis). J. Am. Assoc. Lab. Anim. Sci. 45:64–68.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  142. Zabalgoitia, M., Ventura, J., Lozano, J. L., Anderson, L., Carey, K. D., Hubbard, G. B., Williams, J. T., and Vandeberg, J. L. (2004). Myocardial contrast echocardiography in assessing microcirculation in baboons with chagas disease. Microcirculation 11:271–278.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  143. Zeiss, C. J., and Shomer, N. (2001). Hepatocystosis in a baboon (Papio anubis). Contemp. Top. Lab. Anim. Sci. 40:41–42.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gene B. Hubbard
    • 1
  1. 1.Southwest National Primate Research Center, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical ResearchSan Antonio

Personalised recommendations