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Baboons in Drug Abuse Research

  • Robert D. Hienz
  • Elise M. Weerts
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Baboons and other nonhuman primates have come to play an increasingly important role over the past 30 years as experimental subjects in the area of drug abuse research due to their extensive physiological, anatomical, and behavioral similarities to humans. Compared with other Old World monkeys, the relatively large size of baboons originally made them ideal subjects for drug self-administration and chronic intragastric drug administration studies requiring indwelling catheters. Such studies resulted in the seminal finding of a high concordance between those psychoactive drugs that are self-administered by baboons and those that are abused by humans (Brady et al., 1987, 1990).

Keywords

Psychometric Function Speech Sound Abuse Liability Withdrawal Sign Tone Pitch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert D. Hienz
    • 1
  • Elise M. Weerts
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Behavioral Biology, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimore

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