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A world overview — One-hundred-twenty-seven years of research on toxic cyanobacteria — Where do we go from here?

  • Wayne Carmichael
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 619)

Keywords

Zebra Mussel Microcystis Aeruginosa Paralytic Shellfish Poison Gastrointestinal Illness Toxic Cyanobacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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  2. Arthur JC (1883) Some algae of Minnesota supposed to be poisonous. Bull. Minn. Acad. Sci. 2: 1-12.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wayne Carmichael
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesWright State UniversityDaytonU.S.A.

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