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Keywords

Tolerable Daily Intake Recreational Water Microcystin Concentration Cyanobacterial Toxin Drinking Water Guideline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael D Burch
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Australian Water Quality Centre PMB 3 SalisburyAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.CRC for Water Quality and Treatment PMB 3SalisburyAustralia

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