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Banathy describes social systems design as a “process that carries a stream of shared meaning by a free flow of discourse among the stakeholders who seek to create a new system” (1996, p. 213). Later, he suggests that we “set forth an image of the system we design that is the best we can create, that reflects our highest aspirations and expectations” (p. 307). Appreciative Inquiry provides both a framework and a process for creating “ideal” social systems using a stream of positive conversation.

Keywords

Sage Publication Discovery Phase Shared Vision Positive Theory High Aspiration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen E. Norum

There are no affiliations available

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