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Separating Illumination and Surface Spectral from Multiple Color Signals

  • Akifumi Ikari
  • Rei Kawakami
  • Robby T. Tan
  • Katsushi Ikeuchi

A number of methods have been proposed to separate a color signal into its components: illumination spectral power distribution and surface spectral reflectance. Most of these methods usually use a minimization technique from a single color signal. However, we found that this technique is not effective for real data, because of insufficiency of the constraints. To resolve this problem, we propose a minimization technique that, unlike the existing methods, uses multiple color signals. We present three methods for recovering surface and illumination spectrums which differ in obtaining color signals: first, from two different surface reflectances lit by a single illumination spectral power distribution; second, from identical surface reflectances lit by different illumination spectral power distributions; and third, from a single surface reflectance with two types of reflection components, diffuse and specular, lit by a single illumination spectral power distribution. Practically we applied our method to deal with the color signals of a scene taken by the interference filter, and we separated its illumination spectral power distribution and surface spectral reflectance.

Keywords

Simulated Annealing Algorithm Optical Society Color Signal Color Constancy Separation Algorithm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akifumi Ikari
  • Rei Kawakami
  • Robby T. Tan
  • Katsushi Ikeuchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Industrial ScienceThe University of TokyoMeguro-kuJapan

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