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Consumer Finances of Low-Income Families

  • Steven Garasky
  • Robert B. Nielsen
  • Cynthia Needles Fletcher

Abstract

Serious challenges face families at the bottom of the economic ladder. The difficulties of balancing low incomes against expenditures are exacerbated by a lack of assets and insurance. We examine patterns of family asset ownership and health insurance coverage rates. A review of research focuses on selected dimensions of the financial environment of low-income families: the phenomena of the “unbanked,” home ownership trends, credit use and predatory lending. In each of these areas, additional research is needed to identify ways to help families not only meet their needs, but also to accumulate assets that promote long-term economic well-being.

Keywords

Health Insurance Coverage Home Ownership Consumer Finance Kaiser Family Foundation Asset Accumulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Garasky
    • 1
  • Robert B. Nielsen
  • Cynthia Needles Fletcher
  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Family StudiesIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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