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Risky Credit Card Behavior of College Students

  • Angela C. Lyons

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the credit card practices of college students and identifies specific groups of students who are more likely to be at risk for mismanaging and misusing credit. It specifically highlights findings from one particular study that collected data from a large sample of college students on multiple campuses in the Midwest. In this chapter, educational recommendations are made to financial professionals, who are interested in using this research to develop and provide more effective financial education to college students. Also included is a discussion of emerging research related to college students’ finances and directions for future research.

Keywords

College Student Credit Card Grade Point Average Student Loan High Education Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela C. Lyons
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA

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