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At every stage of an integrated circuit (IC) life cycle the goal of a vendor is to ensure that the product meets its specifications and performs as predicted. This is achieved through product verification at each stage. ICs go through two main verification processes: 1) design verification and 2) manufacturing test. The goal of manufacturing test is to verify that the ICs were manufactured correctly, assuming that the design was correct. Due to the complex mechanical and chemical steps involved, a manufacturing process is inaccurate and induces imperfections that can cause a perfect design to violate its specifications. In a broad sense, the goal of testing is to identify parts (ICs) containing manufacturing defects or imperfections that can cause them to fail or violate specifications before the predicted life span. These include, (a) parts that fail or violate specifications due to defects (random or systematic) during production test, and (b) parts that pass or escape the production test but may violate specifications during their operational life. These are referred to as reliability failures. Devices that fail during the early phase of their operational life are called as infant mortalities and mostly can be identified during burn-in and stress tests.

Keywords

Fault Model Test Pattern Device Under Test Delay Fault Automatic Test Equipment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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