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Taurine 7 pp 439-450 | Cite as

Taurine Haloamines and Heme Oxygenase-1 Cooperate in the Regulation of Inflammation and Attenuation of Oxidative Stress

  • Janusz Marcinkiewicz
  • Maria Walczewska
  • Rafał Olszanecki
  • Małgorzata Bobek
  • Rafał Biedroń
  • Józef Dulak
  • Alicja Józkowicz
  • Ewa Kontny
  • Włodzimierz Maślinski
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 643)

Abstract

Taurine chloramine (TauCl) and Taurine bromamine (TauBr), products of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase halide system, exert anti-inflammatory properties. They inhibit the production of a variety of inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) and proinflammatory cytokines. Heme oxygenase–1 (HO-1), a stress inducible enzyme, degrades heme to biliverdin, free iron and carbon monoxide (CO), which are involved in the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions of HO-1. Recently we have demonstrated that taurine haloamines induce the expression of HO-1 in inflammatory cells. In this study we examined whether HO-1 participates in taurine haloamines-mediated suppression of proinflammatory cytokine production. We have shown that TauCl/TauBr and CO inhibit the production of TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-6, in a similar dose-dependent manner. However, the suppressor activity of TauCl was not altered in HO-1 deficient mice. Therefore, HO-1 and TauCl may independently regulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We suggest that TauCl and TauBr provide a link between the two antioxidant systems: the cysteine pathway and the heme oxygenase system.

Keywords

Peritoneal Macrophage Heme Degradation Taurine Chloramine Taurine Bromamine Heme Degradation Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janusz Marcinkiewicz
    • 1
  • Maria Walczewska
  • Rafał Olszanecki
  • Małgorzata Bobek
  • Rafał Biedroń
  • Józef Dulak
  • Alicja Józkowicz
  • Ewa Kontny
  • Włodzimierz Maślinski
  1. 1.Chair of ImmunologyInstitute of RheumatologyPoland

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