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Navigating Health Systems

  • Daniel J. O’Shea
Chapter

The World Health Organization has defined health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. It is the extent to which an individual or group is able, on the one hand, to realize aspirations and satisfy needs and, on the other hand, to change or cope with the environment” (Brotman, Ryan, Jalbert, & Rowe, 2002, p. 27). Solarz (1999) has noted that by emphasizing social and personal resources in addition to physical capacities, this definition acknowledges the relationship and need for balance between individuals and their environment.

Keywords

Sexual Orientation Gender Identity Sexual Minority Heterosexual Woman Bisexual Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. O’Shea
    • 1
  1. 1.HIV, STD and Hepatitis Branch, Public Health Services, County of San DiegoSan DiegoUSA

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