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The Cultural System: Mythology and Ethos

  • Donald Swenson

Keywords

African American Woman Attachment Theory Insecure Attachment Attachment Behaviour Attachment Bond 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald Swenson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyMount Royal CollegeCalgary ABCanada

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