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The Chronosytem: A Social History of Religion and the Family Orientation

  • Donald Swenson

Keywords

Fourteenth Century Twelfth Century Yersinia Pestis Eleventh Century Romantic Love 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald Swenson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyMount Royal CollegeCalgary ABCanada

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