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A Theoretical Approach to Information Needs Across Different Healthcare Stakeholders

  • Reetta Raitoharju
  • Eeva Aarnio
Part of the IFIP International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 252)

Abstract

Increased access to medical information can lead to information overload among both the employees in the healthcare sector as well as among healthcare consumers. Moreover, medical information can be hard to understand for consumers who have no prerequisites for interpreting and understanding it. Information systems (e.g. electronic patient records) are normally designed to meet the demands of one professional group, for instance those of physicians. Therefore, the same information in the same form is presented to all the users of the systems regardless of the actual need or prerequisites. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the differences in information needs across different stakeholders in healthcare. A literature review was conducted to collect examples of these different information needs. Based on the findings the role of more user specific information systems is discussed.

Keywords

Medical Information Electronic Patient Record Medical Informatics Information Overload Healthcare Consumer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reetta Raitoharju
    • 1
  • Eeva Aarnio
    • 1
  1. 1.Information Systems ScienceTurku School of EconomicsTurkuFinland

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