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Phase Transitions and Hygroscopicity in Chewing Gum Manufacture

  • Jorge Welti-Chanes
  • F. Vergara-Balderas
  • E. Pérez
  • D. Bermúdez
  • A. Valdez-Fragoso
  • H. Mújica-Paz
Conference paper
Part of the Food Engineering series book series (FSES)

Confectionery products constitute a very important branch in the food industry. There are several confectionery products: chewing gum, candy, and chocolate among others. Beside chocolate, chewing gum is one of the most consumed products in the world. Chewing gum is a product made with natural or man-made gums, polymers, and copolymers, added with other ingredients and food additives.

Traditionally, chewing gum was made of natural gums, although for reasons of economy and quality, many modern chewing gums use synthetic gums. These have proven beneficial in providing high consistency of chewing quality. To obtain acceptable products, gum properties must be maintained during manufacture of chewing gum. Most chewing gums are manufactured according to the following steps: The gum base is melted; other ingredients are added and mixed. The blended gum passes onto cooling belts and is bathed in currents of cool air to reduce its temperature; after this, the gum is extruded and flattened into thinner and thinner sheets. The gum passes into the scoring machine. The scored sheets are conditioned (“set” in an air-conditioned room) and then, candy-coated. Finally, the chewing gum is wrapped.

Keywords

Vinyl Acetate Differential Scanning Calorimetry Thermogram Cool Room Moisture Sorption Isotherm Confectionery Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge Welti-Chanes
    • 1
  • F. Vergara-Balderas
    • 1
  • E. Pérez
    • 1
  • D. Bermúdez
    • 2
  • A. Valdez-Fragoso
    • 3
  • H. Mújica-Paz
    • 3
  1. 1.Departamento de Ingeniería Química y AlimentosUniversidad de las Américas-PueblaMéxico
  2. 2.Center for Nonthermal Processing of FoodWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  3. 3.Escuela de Ciencias QuímicasUniversidad Autónoma de ChihuahuaMéxico

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