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Effect of High Temperature on Shrinkage and Porosity of Crispy Dried Bananas

  • K. Hofsetz
  • C. Costa Lopes
  • M. Dupas Hubinger
  • L. Mayor
  • A. M. Sereno
Conference paper
Part of the Food Engineering series book series (FSES)

The most common drying method employed for food materials is hot air drying. This process involves high temperatures and long drying times, which can lead to considerable shrinkage of the final product.

Freeze-drying yields products with high quality and little or no shrinkage, but it is more expensive than hot air drying (Ratti, 2001; Lozano and Saca, 1992; Jayaraman and Das Gupta, 1992).

Therefore, the objectives of this work were: (1) to study the effect of HTST pulse on shrinkage and porosity of bananas; (2) to study the effect of the conventional air drying process (ADP) on shrinkage and porosity of bananas and to compare with the results obtained in (1); (3) to observe structural changes in the banana for both processes, and to try to relate these changes to shrinkage-porosity interaction.

Keywords

Osmotic Dehydration Normalize Moisture Content Time Drying Convective Drying Modeling Shrinkage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Hofsetz
    • 1
  • C. Costa Lopes
    • 1
  • M. Dupas Hubinger
    • 1
  • L. Mayor
    • 2
  • A. M. Sereno
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento de Engenharia de AlimentosFEA-Universidade Estadual de CampinasBrazil
  2. 2.Departamento de Engenharia QuímicaUniverisidade de PortoPortugal

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