Advertisement

Sorption Properties of Dehydrated Model Systems and Their Relationship to the Rate of Non-Enzymatic Browning

  • N. C. Acevedo
  • C. Schebor
  • M. P. del Buera
Conference paper
Part of the Food Engineering series book series (FSES)

The non-enzymatic browning (NEB) reaction is one of the most important chemical reactions that occur in foods during heating and storage. The NEB rate is known to be affected by physico-chemical factors such as concentration and the chemical nature of the reactants, pH, relative humidity, temperature, and time of heating (Labuza and Baisier, 1992). In dehydrated systems, NEB is a diffusion limited reaction, due to mobility restrictions of the reactants; therefore, it can also be affected by the glass transition (Buera and Karel, 1995). Although there are many ways in which water can influence the kinetics of the reaction, some of these influences have been neglected. It is also important to note that water, being a product of the NEB reaction, acts as an inhibitor (Acevedo et al., 2004; 2006). Thus, the purpose of the present work was to analyze the combined effects of several water–solids interactions and the structural properties of model systems on the NEB rate, and the counteracting effects of water as an inhibitor of the browning reaction and its compromise with the solid matrix.

Keywords

Sorption Property Gray Zone Structural Collapse Wheat Starch Supercooled State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Acevedo, N.C., Schebor, C., and Buera M.P., 2004, Prediction of The Relative Humidity for the Maximum Rate of Non-Enzymatic Browning in Food Systems, Res. Adv. Food Sci. 4:2004.Google Scholar
  2. Acevedo, N.C., Schebor, C., and Buera M.P., 2006, Water-Solids Interactions, Matrix Structural Properties and The Rate of Non-Enzymatic Browning, J. Food Eng. 77:1108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bell, L., 1996, Kinetics of Non-Enzymatic Browning in Amorphous Solid Systems: Distinguishing the Effects of Water Activity and the Glass Transition, Food Res. Int. 28:591.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Buera, M.P., and Karel M., 1995, Effect of Physical Changes on the Rates of Nonenzymic Browning and Related Reactions, Food Chem. 52:167.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Greenspan L., 1977, Humidity Fixed Points of Binary Saturated Aqueous Solution, J. Res. Nat. Bureau Stand. – A – Phys. Chem. 81:89.Google Scholar
  6. Labuza, T., and Baisier, W.M., 1992, The Kinetics of Nonenzymatic Browning, in: Physical Chemistry of Foods, H. Schwartzberg and R. Hartel (eds.), Marcel Dekker, M., New York, pp. 595–649.Google Scholar
  7. van den Berg, C., and Bruin S., 1981, Water Activity and Its Estimation in Food Systems Theoretical Aspects, in: Water Activity Influences on Food Quality, L.B. Rockland, and G.E. Stewart (eds.), Academic Press, New York, pp. 185.Google Scholar
  8. White, K., and Bell L., 1999, Glucosa Loss and Maillard Browning in Solids as Affected by Porosity and Collapse, J. Food Sci. 64:1010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. C. Acevedo
    • 1
  • C. Schebor
    • 1
  • M. P. del Buera
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Industrias y de Química OrgánicaUniversidad de Buenos AiresArgentina

Personalised recommendations