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Forecasting the Future of Food Emulsifiers

  • Gerard L. Hasenhuettl

In many areas, the first cut at forecasting future trends involves observing the past, and then extrapolating the data points into the future. For example, the consumption of food ingredients can be correlated with population and personal income growth. Forecasts of consumer tastes are much more difficult. Scientific and technical innovation generally follows an S-curve. Radical (discontinuous) innovation requires a jump to a new S-curve. Humans are generally disinclined to undertake radical experiments with their food consumption (with the possible exception of fad diets for weight loss). Current controversies surrounding genetically modified plants, cloned animals, and irradiation are prominent examples. Nevertheless, radical innovations in nutrition and technology do occur and stimulate changes in food consumption. Recent examples include the glycemic index and adverse health studies for trans fatty acids.

Food emulsifiers exert several technical effects (see Table 1.1), and can be useful tools to address these new trends. This chapter will discuss some trends that may impact on demands for new and modified emulsifier compositions and applications.

Keywords

Trans Fatty Acid Glycemic Index Crystal Network Food Emulsifier Sorbitan Monostearate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerard L. Hasenhuettl
    • 1
  1. 1.Port Saint LucieUSA

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