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Preservation of Forage Crops by Solid-state Lactic Acid Fermentation-Ensiling

  • Zwi G Weinberg

Abstract

Ensiling is a method of moist forage preservation whereby lactic acids bacteria (LAB) ferment water-soluble carbohydrates to organic acids, mainly lactic acid, under anaerobic conditions. As a result, the pH decreases, inhibiting detrimental anaerobes, and so the moist forage is preserved. This is actually lactic acid solid-state fermentation of forage crops. It is similar to the fermentation which takes place during making of sauerkraut. This chapter briefly describes biochemical, microbiological and technological aspects of ensiling.

Keywords

Lactic Acid Lactic Acid Bacterium Forage Crop Lactic Acid Fermentation Coffee Pulp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zwi G Weinberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Forage Preservation and By-Products Research Unit, Department of Food ScienceAgricultural Research OrganizationIsrael

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