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Formation of Capillary Tube-like Structures on Micropatterned Biomaterials

  • Dahai Gao
  • Girish Kumar
  • Carlos Co
  • Chia-Chi Ho
Part of the Advances In Experimental Medicine And Biology book series (AEMB, volume 614)

Abstract

The survival of three-dimensional tissue requires a vascular network to provide transport of oxygen and metabolic byproduct. Here, we report a new approach to create capillary blood vessels in vitro on biomaterials suitable for use as scaffolds in engineering tissues. Endothelial cells were cultured on chemical and topographical patterns of micro-sized grooves on gelatin. Selective attachment and spreading of cells within the grooves was ensured by microcontact printing the plateau regions with cell resistant PEG/PLA (polyethyleneglycol-L-polylacticacid). Human microvascular endothelial cells plated on these patterned biomaterials attached and spread exclusively within the grooves. These topographical features promote endothelial cells to form capillary tube-like structures. The results demonstrated that capillary structures formed on biomaterials are useful for engineering vascularized tissues.

Keywords

Wide Line Polylactic Acid Gelatin Film Human Microvascular Endothelial Cell PDMS Mold 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dahai Gao
    • 1
  • Girish Kumar
    • 1
  • Carlos Co
    • 1
  • Chia-Chi Ho
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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