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Carboxyethylpyrrole Adducts, Age-related Macular Degeneration and Neovascularization

  • Kutralanathan Renganathan
  • Quteba Ebrahem
  • Amit Vasanji
  • Xiaorong Gu
  • Liang Lu
  • Jonathan Sears
  • Robert G. Salomon
  • Bela Anand-Apte
  • John W. Crabb
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 613)

Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in late stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involves abnormal vessel growth from the choriocapillaris through Bruch’s membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and accounts for more than 80%of the severe debilitating vision loss in all AMD patients. The molecular mechanisms associated with AMD pathogenesis and the development of CNV remain poorly understood.We hypothesize that oxidative protein modifications are primary catalysts in AMD pathogenesis and play a role in the development of CNV (Crabb et al., 2002). Oxidative damage has long been suspected of contributing to AMD (Beatty et al., 2000), supported by indirect evidence that smoking increases the risk of AMD (Seddon et al., 1996) and that antioxidant vitamins and zinc can slow disease progression for select individuals (AREDS, 2001).

Keywords

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Retinal Pigment Epithelium Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell ARPE19 Cell Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kutralanathan Renganathan
    • 1
  • Quteba Ebrahem
    • 1
  • Amit Vasanji
    • 2
  • Xiaorong Gu
    • 1
  • Liang Lu
    • 3
  • Jonathan Sears
    • 1
  • Robert G. Salomon
    • 3
  • Bela Anand-Apte
    • 1
  • John W. Crabb
    • 1
  1. 1.Cole Eye Institute, Department of ChemistryCase Western Reserve UniversityCleveland
  2. 2.Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Case Western Reserve UniversityCleveland
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryCase Western Reserve UniversityCleveland

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