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The Bonobos pp 135-149 | Cite as

Relationships among Fruit Abundance, Ranging Rate, and Party Size and Composition of Bonobos at Wamba

  • Takeshi Furuichi
  • Mbangi Mulavwa
  • Kumugo Yangozene
  • Mikwaya Yamba-Yamba
  • Balemba Motema-Salo
  • Gen’ichi Idani
  • Hiroshi Ihobe
  • Chie Hashimoto
  • Yasuko Tashiro
  • Ndunda Mwanza
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

As close relatives, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) share some important characteristics in their social structure. Both species form male philopatric unit-groups, with males remain in their natal group and females transfer between groups before they reach sexual maturity (Nishida 1979, Kano 1982, 1992, Goodall 1986, Wrangham 1986, 1987, Pusey and Packer 1987, Nishida et al. 1990, Furuichi 1989, 2006, Wallis 1997, Reynolds 2005). In addition, unit-groups of both species split into foraging parties of flexible size and composition (Kuroda 1979, Nishida 1979, Wrangham 1979, Goodall 1986, Kano 1982, 1992). However, the species show marked differences in their association patterns. In chimpanzees, males tend to join larger parties more frequently than females do, while females tend to range alone or in smaller parties (Nishida 1979, Wrangham 1979, 2000, Goodall 1986, Janson and Goldsmith 1995, Boesch 1996, Reynolds 2005, Thompson and Wrangham 2005). In contrast, female bonobos tend to join parties more frequently than males do (Kano 1982, 1992, Furuichi 1987, 1989, White 1988, Mulavwa et al. 2008). Many researchers have debated why unrelated females aggregate more than related males do, and they have proposed several hypotheses on this matter, presented below (White and Wrangham 1988, Kano 1992, Wrangham 2000, Furuichi 2006).

Keywords

High Social Status Party Size Scramble Competition Fruit Abundance Female Chimpanzee 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Furuichi
    • 1
  • Mbangi Mulavwa
    • 2
  • Kumugo Yangozene
    • 2
  • Mikwaya Yamba-Yamba
    • 2
  • Balemba Motema-Salo
    • 2
  • Gen’ichi Idani
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Ihobe
    • 4
  • Chie Hashimoto
    • 1
  • Yasuko Tashiro
    • 3
  • Ndunda Mwanza
    • 2
  1. 1.Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityAichiJapan
  2. 2.Research Center for Ecology and ForestryMinistry of Scientific Research and TechnologyD.R. Congo
  3. 3.Hayashibara Biochemical LaboratoriesGreat Ape Research InstituteJapan
  4. 4.School of Human SciencesSugiyama Jogakuen UniversityJapan

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