Advertisement

Facilitating Organized Crime: The Role of Lawyers and Notaries

  • Hans Nelen
  • Francien Lankhorst
Part of the Studies in Organized Crime book series (SOOC, volume 7)

On Monday, 31 October 2005, 36-old Dutch lawyer Evert Hingst was murdered in front of his house in Amsterdam. Among Hingst’s clients were many noted and alleged criminals, including John Mieremet, who was once shot in front of Hingst’s office. After this assault, Mieremet claimed that Hingst had tried to set him up. Mieremet was murdered 3 days after the liquidation of Hingst, on 2 November, in Thailand. Hingst, a fiscal specialist, had been accused of assisting criminals to launder their money abroad. He was imprisoned for several weeks after police discovered three firearms and a large sum of cash during a raid of his office in 2005. A suspect of money laundering, membership of a criminal organisation and possession of firearms, Hingst gave up his profession as a lawyer in July 2005. He had previously been arrested on charges of forgery of documents in 2004.

Keywords

Organize Crime Asylum Seeker Human Trafficking Money Laundering Criminal Organisation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bunt, H. G. van de. (1996). Inzake Opsporing Bijlage X. Deel III onderzoeksgroep Fijnaut. Beroepsgroepen en fraude. ‘s-Gravenhage: Sdu uitgevers.Google Scholar
  2. Chevrier, E. (2004). The French government’s will to fight organized crime and clean up the legal professions; the awkward compromise between professional secrecy and mandatory reporting. Crime, Law and Social Change, 42(2–3), 189–200.Google Scholar
  3. Faber, W., & van Nunen, A. A. A. (2004). Uit onverdachte bron. Evaluatie van de keten van ongebruikelijke transacties. Onderzoek en beleid 218. Den Haag: Ministerie van Justitie, WODC.Google Scholar
  4. Fijnaut, C., Bovenkerk, F., Bruinsma, G., & Bunt, H. G. van de. (1998). Organized crime in the Netherlands. The Hague: Kluwer Law International.Google Scholar
  5. Green, G. S. (1990). Occupational crime. Chicago: Nelson-Hall.Google Scholar
  6. Kleemans, E. R., Berg, E. A. I. M. van den, & Bunt, H. G. van de. (1998). Georganiseerde criminaliteit in Nederland, Rapportage op basis van de WODC-monitor. Onderzoek en beleid 198. Den Haag: Ministerie van Justitie, WODC.Google Scholar
  7. Kleemans, E. R., Brienen, M. E. I., & Bunt, H. G. van de. (2002). Georganiseerde criminaliteit in Nederland, Tweede rapportage op basis van de WODC-monitor. Onderzoek en beleid 198. Den Haag: Ministerie van Justitie, WODC.Google Scholar
  8. Lankhorst, F., & Nelen, H. (2004). Professionele dienstverlening en georganiseerde criminaliteit; Hedendaagse integriteitsdilemma’s van advocaten en notarissen. Zeist: Uitgeverij Kerkebosch b.v.Google Scholar
  9. Levi, M. (2002). Money laundering and its regulations. The Annals of the American Academy, AAPSS, 2002, 582, 181–194.Google Scholar
  10. Middleton, J., & Levi, M. (2004). The role of solicitors in facilitating ‘Organized Crime’: Situational crime opportunities and their regulation. Crime, Law and Social Change, 42(2–3), 123–161.Google Scholar
  11. Nicola, A. di, & Zoffi, P. (2004). Italian lawyers and criminal clients: Risks and countermeasures. Crime, Law and Social Change, 42(2–3), 201–225.Google Scholar
  12. Terlouw, G. J., & Aron, U. (1996). Twee jaar MOT. Een evaluatie van de uitvoering van de wet melding ongebruikelijke transacties. Onderzoek en beleid 158. Arnhem: Gouda Quint.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Nelen
  • Francien Lankhorst

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations