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Training for orbital flight

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

At the time of writing, five civilian astronauts have visited the International Space Station, each of whom have paid $20 million for the privilege. Dennis Tito, Greg Olsen, Mark Shuttleworth, Anousheh Ansari, and Charles Simonyi each spent six months in Star City in order to complete the 900 hours training required to be qualified to fly into orbit. The training you will complete at your operator’s facility will cover the same subject areas and achieve the same objectives as Dennis Tito and company, but you will spend only 248 hours spread out over only five weeks. The five weeks of training will be demanding, stressful, and challenging but ultimately rewarding, because on completion you will be trained to fly in space.

Keywords

Rapid Decompression Reaction Control System Human Patient Simulator Personal Data Assistant Space Motion Sickness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2008

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