Advertisement

Childhood Sexual Abuse and its Sequelae Among Latino Gay and Bisexual Men

  • Sonya Grant Arreola

Keywords

Sexual Risk Risky Sexual Behavior Sexual Compulsivity Mortality Weekly Report Childhood Sexual Abuse History 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allers, C. T., White, J. F., & Mullis, F. (1997). The treatment of dissociation in an HIV-infected, sexually abused adolescent male. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 34(2), 201–206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Anon. (2005). Epidemic is shifting to blacks, Hispanics. Most common transmission is MSM. AIDS Alert, 20(8), 89–90.Google Scholar
  3. Arreola, S. (2001). Aspectos psicosociales y conductas del sexo forzado en ninos y ninas jovenes (Psychosocial aspects and behaviors related to forced sex in young boys and girls). Paper presented at the VIII Congresso Mexicano De Psicologia Social & I Congresso Mexicano De Relaciones Personales, Guadalajara, Mexico.Google Scholar
  4. Arreola, S.G. (2005). Sexual risk among Latino gay men: Modeling the link between childhood sexual abuse and adult sexual risk. Paper presented at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Critical Research Issues in Latino Mental Health 2005 Conference: Biological and Psychosocial Influences on Diagnosis and Treatment, Princeton, New Jersey.Google Scholar
  5. Arreola, S. (2006). Childhood Sexual Abuse and HIV among Latino Gay Men: The price of sexual silence during the AIDS epidemic. In N. Teunis (Ed.), Sexual Inequalities and social justice. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  6. Arreola, S., & Diaz, R. M. (2001, October). Forced sexual abuse and risky sexual situations among Latino gay men. Paper presented at the Ninth International Conference of the National Organization on Male Sexual Victimization, New York, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Arreola, S. G. (2005). Sexual Risk among Latino Gay Men: Modeling the link between childhood sexual abuse and adult sexual risk. Paper presented at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Critical Research Issues in Latino Mental Health 2005 Conference: Biological and Psychosocial Influences on Diagnosis and Treatment, Princeton, New Jersey.Google Scholar
  8. Arreola, S. G., Neilands, T. B., Pollack, L. M., Paul, J. P., & Catania, J. A. (2005). Higher prevalence of childhood sexual abuse among Latino men who have sex with men than non-Latino men who have sex with men: data from the Urban Men’s Health Study. Child Abuse & Neglect, 29(3), 285–290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Boney-McCoy, S., & Finkelhor, D. (1995). Psychosocial sequelae of violent victimization in a national youth sample. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63(5), 726–736.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Briggs, L., & Joyce, P. R. (1997). What determines post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology for survivors of childhood sexual abuse? Child Abuse & Neglect, 21(6), 575–582.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Carballo-Dieguez, A., & Dolezal, C. (1995). Association between history of childhood sexual abuse and adult HIV-risk sexual behavior in Puerto Rican men who have sex with men. Child Abuse & Neglect, 19(5), 595–605.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2001). HIV testing among racial/ethnic minorities—United States, 1999 (Vol. 50, pp. 1054–1058): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2001a). National Center for HIV, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention (NCHSTP). Last accessed April 6, 2007; Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/basic.htm.Google Scholar
  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2001b). NIAID. Last accessed April 6, 2007; Available at: cdc.gov/omh/AMH/factsheets/hiv.htm.Google Scholar
  15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2002a). Health, United States 2002, Table 33. Last accessed December 10, 2006; Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/tables/2002/02hus033.pdf.Google Scholar
  16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2002c). NCHS Health United States, Table 54. Last accessed April 6, 2007; Available at: cdc.gov/omh/AMH/factsheets/hiv.htm.Google Scholar
  17. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2004). Health disparities experienced by Hispanics—United States. MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, 53(40), 935–937.Google Scholar
  18. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2005). Trends in HIV/AIDS diagnoses—33 states, 2001–2004. MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, 54(45), 1149–1153.Google Scholar
  19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006a). Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS—United States, 1981–2005. MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, 55(21), 589–592.Google Scholar
  20. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006b). The Global HIV/AIDS pandemic, 2006. MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, 55(31), 841–844.Google Scholar
  21. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2006c). Racial/ethnic disparities in diagnoses of HIV/AIDS—33 states, 2001–2004. MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, 55(5), 121–125.Google Scholar
  22. Chu, J. A. (2000). Psychological defense styles and childhood sexual abuse. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157(10), 1707.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Diaz, R. M. (1997). Latino gay men and psycho-cultural barriers to AIDS prevention. In In changing times: Gay men and lesbians encounter HIV/AIDS. (pp. 221–244). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  24. Diaz, R. M. (1998). Latino gay men and HIV: Culture, sexuality, and risk behavior. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
  25. Diaz, R. M., & Ayala, G. (1999). Love, passion and rebellion: Ideologies of HIV risk among Latino gay men in the USA. Culture, Health & Sexuality, 1(3), 277–293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Diaz, R. M., Ayala, G., & Bein, E. (2004). Sexual risk as an outcome of social oppression: data from a probability sample of Latino gay men in three U.S. cities. Cultural Diversity Ethnic Minority Psychoogy, 10(3), 255–267.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Diaz, R. M., Ayala, G., Bein, E., Henne, J., & Marin, B. V. (2001). The impact of homophobia, poverty, and racism on the mental health of gay and bisexual Latino men: Findings from 3 US cities. American Journal of Public Health, 91(6), 927–932.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Diaz, R. M., Ayala, G., & Marin, B. V. (2000). Latino gay men and HIV: Risk behavior as a sign of oppression. Focus, 15(7), 1–5.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  29. Dolezal, C., & Carballo-Dieguez, A. (2002). Childhood sexual experiences and the perception of abuse among Latino men who have sex with men. Journal of Sex Research, 39(3), 165–173.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Feiring, C., Taska, L., & Lewis, M. (1999). Age and gender differences in children’s and adolescents’ adaptation to sexual abuse. Child Abuse & Neglect, 23(2), 115–128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Fontes, L. (1995). Sexual abuse in nine North American Cultures: Treatment and prevention. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  32. Guzman, B. (2001). The Hispanic Population: Census 2000 Brief: U.S. Census Bureau, Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration.Google Scholar
  33. Holmes, W. C. (1997). Association between a history of childhood sexual abuse and subsequent, adolescent psychoactive substance use disorder in a sample of HIV seropostive men. Journal of Adolescent Health, 20(6), 414–419.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Janet, P. (1889). L’automatisme psychologique (Vol. Reprint: Societe Pierre Janet, Paris, 1973). Paris: Felix Alcan.Google Scholar
  35. Jarama, S. L., Kennamer, J. D., Poppen, P. J., Hendricks, M., & Bradford, J. (2005). Psychosocial, behavioral, and cultural predictors of sexual risk for HIV infection among Latino men who have sex with men. AIDS Behavior, 9(4), 513–523.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Jinich, S., Paul, J. P., Stall, R., Acree, M., Kegeles, S. M., & Hoff, C., et al. (1998). Childhood sexual abuse and HIV risk-taking behavior among gay and bisexual men. AIDS & Behavior, 2(1), 41–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Johnson, D. M., Pike, J. L., & Chard, K. M. (2001). Factors predicting PTSD, depression, and dissociative severity in female treatment-seeking childhood sexual abuse survivors. Child Abuse & Neglect, 25(1), 179–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Koenig, L. J., Doll, L. S., O’Leary, A., & Pequegnat, W. (Eds.). (2003). From Child Sexual Abuse to Adult Sexual Risk: Trauma, revictimization, and intervention. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association Press.Google Scholar
  39. Lenderking, W. R., Wold, C., Mayer, K. H., Goldstein, R., Losina, E., & Seage, G. R., III. (1997). Childhood sexual abuse among homosexual men: Prevalence and association with unsafe sex. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 12(4), 250–253.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Lindholm, K. J., & Willey, R. (1986). Ethnic differences in child abuse and sexual abuse. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 8(2), 111–125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Moisan, P. A., Sanders-Phillips, K., & Moisan, P. M. (1997). Ethnic differences in circumstances of abuse and symptoms of depression and anger among sexually abused Black and Latino boys. Child Abuse & Neglect, 21(5), 473–488.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Mulder, R. T., Beautrais, A. L., Joyce, P. R., & Fergusson, D. M. (1998). Relationship between dissociation, childhood sexual abuse, childhood physical abuse, and mental illness in a general population sample. American Journal of Psychiatry, 155(6), 806–811.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Neumann, D. A., Houskamp, B. M., Pollock, V. E., & Briere, J. (1996). The long-term sequelae of childhood sexual abuse in women: A meta-analytic review. Child Maltreatment: Journal of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, 1(1), 6–16.Google Scholar
  44. Paul, J. P., Catania, J., Pollack, L., & Stall, R. (2001). Understanding childhood sexual abuse as a predictor of sexual risk-taking among men who have sex with men: The Urban Men’s Health Study. Child Abuse & Neglect, 25(4), 557–584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Remafedi, G., Farrow, J. A., & Deisher, R. W. (1991). Risk factors for attempted suicide in gay and bisexual youth. Pediatrics, 87(6), 869–875.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  46. Schwartz, M. F., Galperin, L. D., & Masters, W. H. (1995). Dissociation and treatment of compulsive reenactment of trauma: Sexual compulsivity. In M. Hunter (Ed.), Adult survivors of to be sexually abusive: Treatment innovations (pp. 42–55). Thousand Oaks, CA, US: Sage Publications, Inc.Google Scholar
  47. Valleroy, L A., MacKellar, D. A., Karon, J. M., Rosen, D. H., McFarland, W., & Shehan, D. A., et al. (2000). HIV prevalence and associated risks in young men who have sex with men. Young Men’s Survey Study Group. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284(2), 198–204.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Weiss, E. L., Longhurst, J. G., & Mazure, C. M. (1999). Childhood sexual abuse as a risk factor for depression in women: Psychosocial and neurobiological correlates. American Journal of Psychiatry, 156(6), 816–828.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sonya Grant Arreola
    • 1
  1. 1.San Francisco Department of Public HealthSan Francisco

Personalised recommendations