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Creativity

  • Matthew C. Makel
  • Jonathan A. Plucker

Creativity is arguably among the most important—yet least understood—psychological constructs. Creativity is often conceptualized as an engine of economic development as well as the impetus behind technological advances, workplace leadership, and life success (see Amabile, 1998; Davila, Epstein, & Shelton, 2006; Kappel &Rubenstein, 1999; Stevens & Burley, 1999; Tierney, Farmer, & Graen, 1999; Torrance, 1981a). Florida (2002, 2005) goes so far as to make a strong case that the American economy is, in fact, a “Creative Economy.”

Of course, creativity’s virtues extend beyond economic benefits. The recent rise in popularity of positive psychology, with its shift in emphasis from pathology to prevention and personal strengths, has focused attention on the use of creativity and creative development as paths to improve the human condition. For example, creativity has been associated with maintaining healthy, loving relationships (Livingston, 1999), effective therapy (Kendall, Chu, Gifford, Hayes, & Nauta, 1998), learning to resolve conflicts effectively (Webb, 1995), combat grief (Davis, 1989), and even the use of humor to defuse potentially violent circumstances (Jurcova, 1998). With such a diverse array of effects, one might presume an abundance of attention and funds have been spent researching creativity. However, Sternberg and Lubart (1996) concluded that psychology researchers have committed far too few resources toward creativity given its importance to the field and the world, and the situation appears to have changed little since their observations a decade ago.

Keywords

Creative Process Creative Thinking Implicit Theory Creativity Research Divergent Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew C. Makel
  • Jonathan A. Plucker

There are no affiliations available

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