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Psychology, Psychologists, and Gifted Students

  • James J. Gallagher

Psychologists show great curiosity about the world and human behavior. They are forever asking Why? Or What? Or How? about various aspects of human behavior. It is no surprise, therefore, that they respond enthusiastically to some of the questions surrounding the behavior of those labeled as gifted and talented in our society. As we shall see in this volume there are more psychologists intrigued by these questions than are actively working on them but that is due to the vagaries of funding, access, and other technical matters. Some of the key questions posed in this handbook are:

  • Who are the gifted?

  • How do we identify gifted?

  • What are the key characteristics of gifted students?

  • Where does giftedness emerge from?

  • Can we enhance giftedness?

  • Can we design public policy to favor students?

All of these issues will be discussed in greater length in the following chapters but we propose to provide an overview of what is necessary to answer these questions and provide some understanding of why we stand at this point in history.

Keywords

Picture Book Gifted Student Gifted Child Talent Development Talented Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • James J. Gallagher
    • 1
  1. 1.Frank Porter Graham InstituteUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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