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A Multi-Agent Design for a Home Automation System dedicated to power management

  • Shadi Abras
  • Stéphane Ploix
  • Sylvie Pesty
  • Mireille Jacomino
Part of the IFIP The International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 247)

Abstract

This paper presents the principles of a Home Automation System dedicated to power management that adapts power consumption to available power ressources according to user comfort and cost criteria. The system relies on a multi-agent paradigm. Each agent, supporting a type of service achieved by one or several devices, cooperates and coordinates its action with others in order to find an acceptable near-optimal solution. The control algorithm is decomposed into two complementary mechanisms: a reactive mechanism, which protects from constraint violations, and an anticipation mechanism, which computes a predicted plan of global consumption according to predicted productions and consumptions and to user criteria. The paper presents a design for the Multi Agent Home Automation System.

Keywords

Power Management Constraint Satisfaction Problem Constraint Violation Anticipation Mechanism Power Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Information Processing 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shadi Abras
    • 1
  • Stéphane Ploix
    • 2
  • Sylvie Pesty
    • 1
  • Mireille Jacomino
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire LIG-Institut IMAGCNRS, UMR5217France
  2. 2.Laboratoire G-SCOPCNRS, UMR5528GrenobleFrance

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