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Space Rescue pp 237-286 | Cite as

Away from Earth

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

The long training program is behind them. After hours in simulations, the preparation to make contingency, emergency and launch escape procedures has become second-nature. Hopefully, all has gone well and the crew is finally in Earth orbit and looking forward to their planned mission. After all the expectations, excitement and challenges of finally leaving the launch pad and making a rapid and at times violent ride into space in less than 10 minutes, the view out of the window can be breathtaking. Orbiting the world in 90 minutes 16 times a day certainly makes the effort even sweeter. However, as every crewmember is aware just making it into space is by no means a guaranteed safe ride to the end of the mission. Sometimes a problem that developed on the way into orbit means the stay is very short and contingency or emergency procedures have to be followed to get down as quickly as possible. Perhaps the stay in orbit is amended to a contingency or shortened, abbreviated visit to space and a challenging ride home.

Keywords

Space Shuttle Lunar Orbit Rapid Response Team Orbit Option Ride Home 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2009

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