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The Moon pp 117-129 | Cite as

Circumferential lunar utilities

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

The global settlement of the Moon will require electric power and communications as well as transportation networks (the lunar utility infrastructure), on and below the lunar surface. Without these elements in place, the exploration of the Moon and other large-scale tasks would be difficult. When in-situ resource utilization capabilities begin producing infrastructure components, such as solar cells, bricks, metal structures, and electric cable, the placement of a permanent global utilities infrastructure on the Moon will commence. Although technological advances and innovation are expected as a by-product of lunar development, virtually all of the infrastructure needs of the Moon can be satisfied by simply adapting existing Earth-based technologies to the lunar environment. There is no need for technological breakthroughs.

Keywords

Solar Cell Metal Structure Transportation Network Lunar Surface Aerospace Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Praxies Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2008

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