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The Moon pp 97-115 | Cite as

Return of humans to the Moon

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

When a round-trip Earth—Moon transportation capability becomes operational in the second decade of the twenty-first century, humans will return to the Moon, this time to stay. The arrival of humans will initiate the second phase of lunar exploration and development, and the entire pace of lunar activities will accelerate.

Keywords

Permanent Magnet Iron Particle Aerospace Technology Transportation Capability Lunar Exploration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Praxies Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2008

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