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The Moon pp 59-81 | Cite as

Lunar robotic and communication systems

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

It seems inevitable that humankind will someday settle the solar system. The process will begin with small steps and at first we will stay close to home — the Moon. Not only will the techniques we develop for fashioning the Moon to our purposes apply to other places — asteroids, other planets, and their moons — but the Earth itself will benefit. On the Moon and elsewhere we will, over time, find more effective ways to harness the renewable energy of the Sun to provide power, develop improved methods for recycling, and convert the local raw materials into tools and supplies. Many of the resulting processes and techniques will find their way back to Earth. The technology for establishing the first unmanned lunar outpost is available now. This chapter discusses the systems and devices that can be placed on the Moon to establish these first lunar scientific and industrial capabilities.

Keywords

Communication System Renewable Energy Solar System Status Indicator Design Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Praxies Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2008

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