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Present knowledge of the Jupiter ring system

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

In Chapter 4, we covered the discovery of the Jupiter ring system, the sole example of a ring system first discovered by a spacecraft. Scientists preparing the Jupiter encounter observations of Voyager 1 did not devote much time or effort to ring observations, primarily because no ring of Jupiter had ever been detected. The single observation that was added to the Voyager 1 encounter sequence was a long-exposure image designed to search for a possible tenuous ring near Jupiter’s equatorial plane.

Keywords

Giant Planet Particle Population Main Ring Galilean Satellite Near Infrared Radiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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6.7 Notes and References

  1. [1]
    Acuña, M. H., Ness, N. F., 1976, “The complex main magnetic field of Jupiter”, Journal of Geophysical Research 81, 2917–2922.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Burns, J. A., 1999, “Planetary rings”, Chapter 16 in The New Solar System (4th Edition), edited by Beatty, Petersen, and Chaikin, pp. 221–240. The Main ring thickness is given in table 1 on p. 227.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Ibid., pp. 228–229.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Burns, J. A., Schaffer, L. E., Greenberg, R. J., Showalter, M. A., 1985, “Lorentz resonances and the structure of the Jovian ring”, Nature 316, 115–119; Schaffer, L., Burns, J. A., 1992, “Lorentz resonances and the vertical structure of dusty rings: Analytical and numerical results”, Icarus 96, 65–84; Burns, J. A., Simonelli, D. P., Showalter, M. R., Hamilton, D. P., Esposito, L. W., Porco, C. C., Throop, H., 2004, “Jupiter’s Ring-Moon System”, in Jupiter. The planet, satellites, and Magnetosphere, edited by Bagenal, Dowling, and McKinnon, Cambridge Planetary Science Series, pp. 241–262; De Pater, I., Showalter, M. R., Burns, J. A., Nicholson, P. D., Liu, M., Hamilton, D. P., Graham, J. R., 1999, “Keck infrared observations of Jupiter’s ring system near Earth’s 1997 ring plane crossing”, Icarus 138, 214–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    See, for example, Yelle, R. V., Miller, S., 2004, “Jupiter’s thermosphere and ionosphere”, in Jupiter. The planet, satellites and Magnetosphere, edited by Bagenal, Dowling, and McKinnon, Cambridge Planetary Science Series, pp. 185–218.Google Scholar
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    Burns, J. A., 1986, “Some background about satellites”, in Satellites, edited by Burns and Matthews, pp. 1–36.Google Scholar
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    Anderson, J. D., Johnson, T. V., Schubert, G., Asmar, S., Jacobson, R. A., Johnston, D., Lau, E. L., Lewis, G., Moore, W. B., Taylor, A., Thomas, P. C., Weinwurm, G., 2005, “Amalthea’s density is less than that of water”, Science 308, 1291–1293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Smith, B. A., Reitsema, H. J., 1980, “CCD observations of Jupiter’s ring and Amalthea”, in Satellites of Jupiter, volume 57 of the International Astronomical Union’s Colloquium Series.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    Neugebauer, G., Becklin, E. E., Jewitt, D., Terrile, R., Danielson, G. E., 1981, “Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea”, Astronomical Journal 86, 607–610.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Throop, H. B., Porco, C. C., West, R. A., Burns, J. A., Showalter, M. R., Nicholson, P. D., 2004, “The jovian rings: New results derived from Cassini, Galileo, Voyager, and Earth-based observations”, Icarus 172, 59–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

6.8 Bibliography

  1. Jupiter. The planet, satellites and Magnetosphere, 2004, Cambridge University Press, edited by Fran Bagenal, Timothy Dowling and William McKinnon. Note especially the following chapters: Krüger, H., Horányi, M., Krivov, A. V., Graps, A. L., “10. Jovian dust: Streams, clouds and rings”, pp. 219–240; Burns, J. A., Simonelli, D. P., Showalter, M. R., Hamilton, D. P., Esposito, L. W., Porco, C. C., Throop, H., 2004, “11. Jupiter’s Ring-Moon System”, pp. 241–262.Google Scholar
  2. Planetary Rings, 1984, University of Arizona Press, edited by Richard Greenberg and André Brahic. Note especially the following chapters: Burns, J. A., Showalter, M. R., Morfill, G. E., “The ethereal rings of Jupiter and Saturn”, pp. 200–272; Grün, E., Morfill, G. E., Mendis, D. A., “Dust-magnetosphere interactions”, pp. 275–332; Mignard, F., “Effects of radiation forces on dust particles”, pp. 333–366.Google Scholar

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© Praxis Publishing Ltd, Chichester, UK 2007

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