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Joint programmes

Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

Following the highly successful Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) in 1975, both the Soviet Union and the United States agreed to develop follow-on rendezvous and docking activity that would include an American Space Shuttle (which had yet to fly) and a Soviet Salyut space station, probably during 1981.1 The intergovernmental agreement was signed in 1977 and extensive cooperative work was conducted during 1978, but the project faltered due to concerns over Soviet human rights issues, the international actions of the Soviet Union, and American fears over the transfer of technology. The increasingly strained relationship between the two countries over the 1978–1982 period saw the civil space agreement lapse in May 1982. Over the next decade, there was little cooperation in manned space operations, although cooperative unmanned and life sciences programmes were ongoing and a group of US astronauts visited Russia in February 1990.

Keywords

Space Flight Crew Member Duration Mission Onboard System Shuttle Mission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© PraxisPublishing Ltd. 2005

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