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Revisiting Primate Postcrania from the Pondaung Formation of Myanmar

The Purported Anthropoid Astragalus
  • Gregg F. Gunnell
  • Russell L. Ciochcon
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Keywords

Middle Eocene Late Eocene Medial Epicondyle Lemur Catta Catarrhine Primate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregg F. Gunnell
    • 1
  • Russell L. Ciochcon
  1. 1.Museum of PaleontologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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