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Oxidative Stress Impairs Upper Airway Muscle Endurance in an Animal Model of Sleep-Disordered Breathing

  • Mark Dunleavy
  • Aidan Bradford
  • Ken D. O'Halloran
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

Obstructive sleep apnoea is characterised by intermittent hypoxia due to recurrent obstructions of the pharyngeal airway during sleep. We have shown that chronic intermittent hypoxia impairs respiratory muscle function and CNS control of upper airway patency. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that disruption of an endogenous antioxidant defence system exacerbates the effects of intermittent hypoxia on upper airway muscle contractile function. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were placed in restrainers with their heads in hoods in which the ambient oxygen concentration could be modified by controlling the gas supply to the hoods. Sixteen rats were exposed to alternating equal periods of hypoxia and normoxia, twice per minute, 8 hours per day for 1 week. The remaining 16 animals were exposed to normoxia continuously under identical experimental conditions. In both groups, half the animals received daily injections of buthionine sulfoxamine (BSO), an inhibitor of the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione synthesis. The other half received daily vehicle injections. At the end of the 1-week treatment period, the sternohyoid muscles were removed and fatigue characteristics were determined in vitro. Intermittent hypoxia was associated with a decrease in sternohyoid muscle endurance, an effect that was exacerbated by treatment with BSO.

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Intermittent Hypoxia Muscle Strip Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Dunleavy
    • 1
  • Aidan Bradford
    • 1
  • Ken D. O'Halloran
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Medical PhysicsRoyal College of Surgeons in IrelandIreland
  2. 2.School of Medicine and Medical ScienceUniversity College DublinDublinIreland

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