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Prediction of Periodic Breathing at Altitude

  • Keith Burgess
  • Katie Burgess
  • Prajan Subedi
  • Phil Ainslie
  • Zbigniew Topor
  • William Whitelaw
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

Periodic breathing at high altitude has been known to occur for perhaps hundreds of years, but was first described in the medical literature by Mosso in 1898 (Mosso 1898). Lahiri et al. (1983) published an examination of the relationship between ventilatory response to hypoxia measured at high altitude (5,300 m) and prevalence of periodic breathing during sleep at that altitude in a group of acclimatized mountaineers and high altitude sherpas as part of the American Medical Expedition to Mount Everest (Lahiri, Maret and Sherpa 1983). They showed a strong correlation between high ventilatory response to hypoxaemia at altitude in awake subjects who were acclimatized for a month and the prevalence of central sleep apnea. When we studied the relationship between ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia at sea level, and the subsequent prevalence of periodic breathing at high altitude, we found no such relationship (Burgess 2001; Burgess Johnson and Edwards 2004), probably because ventilatory responses change due to acclimatization.

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnea High Altitude Sleep Apnea Ventilatory Response Severity Obstructive Sleep Apnea 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Burgess
  • Katie Burgess
  • Prajan Subedi
  • Phil Ainslie
  • Zbigniew Topor
  • William Whitelaw

There are no affiliations available

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