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CPAP Inhibits Non-nutritive Swallowing Through Stimulation of Bronchopulmonary Receptors

  • Nathalie Samson
  • Charles Duvareille
  • Marie St-Hilaire
  • Véronique Clapperton
  • Jean-Paul Praud
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

While swallowing and respiratory problems are among the most frequent disorders encountered in neonates, the interrelationships between both functions are not completely understood. This is especially true for non-nutritive swallowing (NNS), which fulfills the important function of clearing upper airways from both local secretions and liquids refluxed from the stomach. Recently, we showed that nasal CPAP inhibits NNS during quiet sleep in the newborn lamb (Samson, St-Hilaire, Nsegbe, Reix, Moreau-Bussière and Praud 2005). The present study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that NNS inhibition is eliminated when CPAP is directly administered through a tracheostomy, thus eliminating reflexes originating from upper airway receptors. Results show that both nasal and tracheal CPAP 6 cm H2O similarly inhibit total NNS during quiet sleep, thus suggesting that the inhibiting effect of nasal CPAP on NNS is mainly mediated through bronchopulmonary mechanical receptors with minimal participation of the upper airways.

Keywords

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Extubation Failure Nasal Mask Newborn Lamb 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathalie Samson
    • 1
  • Charles Duvareille
    • 1
  • Marie St-Hilaire
    • 1
  • Véronique Clapperton
    • 1
  • Jean-Paul Praud
    • 1
  1. 1.Neonatal Respiratory Research Unit, Departments of Pediatrics and PhysiologyUniversité de SherbrookeQuébecCanada

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