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Effects of Hypercapnia on Non-nutritive Swallowing in Newborn Lambs

  • Charles Duvareille
  • Nathalie Samson
  • Marie St-Hilaire
  • Philippe Micheau
  • Véronique Bournival
  • Jean-Paul Praud
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hypercapnia on non-nutritive swallowing (NNS) frequency and on NNS-breathing coordination in newborn lambs. Six lambs were chronically instrumented for recording electroencephalogram, eye movements, diaphragm and thyroarytenoid muscle activity, nasal airflow and electrocardiogram. Each lamb was placed in a Plexiglas chamber and exposed to a hypercapnic gas mixture (21% O2, 5% CO2). Polysomnographic recordings were conducted in non-sedated lambs using a custom-designed radiotelemetry system. Results show that hypercapnia increased NNS frequency in all three states of alertness (p < 0.0001 to 0.03), through a specific increase in ie-type NNS. Causal mechanisms and potential consequences of such observations on aspirations and apneas, as well as on swallowing maturation, will require further studies.

Keywords

Respiratory Control Nucleus Tractus Solitarius Nasal Airflow Plexiglas Chamber Free Nerve Ending 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles Duvareille
    • 1
  • Nathalie Samson
    • 1
  • Marie St-Hilaire
    • 1
  • Philippe Micheau
    • 2
  • Véronique Bournival
    • 1
  • Jean-Paul Praud
    • 1
  1. 1.Neonatal Respiratory Research Unit, Departments of Pediatrics and PhysiologyUniversité de SherbrookeQuebecCanada
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversité de SherbrookeQuebecCanada

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