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The Carotid Chemoreceptors are a Major Determinant of Ventilatory CO2 Sensitivity and of PaCO2 During Eupneic Breathing

  • Hubert V. Forster
  • Paul Martino
  • Matt Hodges
  • Katie Krause
  • Josh Bonis
  • Suzanne Davis
  • L. Pan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

Both carotid and intracranial chemoreceptors are critical to a normal ventilatory CO2—H+ chemosensitivity. At low levels of hypercapnia, the carotid contribution is probably greater than the central contribution but, at high levels, the intracranial chemoreceptors are dominant. The carotid chemoreceptors are also critical to maintaining a stable and normal eupneic PaCO2, but lesion-induced attenuation of intracranial CO2—H+ chemosensitivity does not consistently alter eupneic PaCO2. A major unanswered question is why do intracranial chemoreceptors in carotid body denervation (CBD) animals tolerate an acidosis during eupnea which prior to CBD elicits a marked increase in breathing.

Keywords

Ventilatory Response Ibotenic Acid Peripheral Chemoreceptor Ventral Medulla Carotid Chemoreceptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hubert V. Forster
    • 1
  • Paul Martino
  • Matt Hodges
  • Katie Krause
  • Josh Bonis
  • Suzanne Davis
  • L. Pan
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyWisconsin Medical CollegeMilwaukeeUSA

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