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Respiratory Control, Respiratory Sensations and Cycling Endurance After Respiratory Muscle Endurance Training

  • Samuel Verges
  • Urs Kruttli
  • Bernhard Stahl
  • Ralf Frigg
  • Christina M. Spengler
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

Respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) was shown to increase endurance performance in healthy subjects. Reduced adverse respiratory sensations might contribute to this improvement. In the present study, we aimed to assess the relationship between changes in respiratory sensations and changes in ventilation and endurance performance after RMET. Fourteen healthy subjects completed either forty 15-min RMETs (n = 8) or did no training (control, n = 6). Respiratory endurance increased significantly after RMET while breathlessness and respiratory exertion were significantly reduced. Cycling endurance did not change while average ventilation was increased and perception of respiratory exertion was reduced. We conclude that (1) RMET reduces adverse respiratory sensations during isolated and exercise-induced hyperpnea even in the face of increased respiratory drive, and (2) the reduction in adverse respiratory sensations after RMET does not per se cause an increase in endurance performance. Whether the reduced perception of adverse respiratory sensations during exercise after RMET might be the cause of the increased respiratory drive remains to be clarified.

Keywords

Endurance Performance Respiratory Muscle Exercise Performance Respiratory Control Respiratory Muscle Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel Verges
    • 1
  • Urs Kruttli
    • 1
  • Bernhard Stahl
    • 1
  • Ralf Frigg
    • 1
  • Christina M. Spengler
    • 1
  1. 1.Exercise Physiology, Institute for Human Movement Sciences, ETH Zurich, and Institute of Physiology and Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP)University of ZurichSwitzerland

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