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Ventilatory Control during Intermittent High-Intensity Exercise in Humans

  • Andrew J. Cathcart
  • Anthony P. Turner
  • Christopher Butterworth
  • Matthew Parker
  • John Wilson
  • Susan A. Ward
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

Intermittent supra-maximal cycling of varying work: recovery durations was used to explore the kinetics of respiratory compensation for the metabolic acidosis of high-intensity exercise (> lactate threshold, θl). For a 10:20 s duty-cycle, blood [lactate] ([L]) was not increased, and there was no evidence of respiratory compensation (RC); i.e, no increase in the ventilation (Ve)-CO2 output (Vco2) slope, nor fall in end-tidal PCO2 (PETCO2). For longer duty-cycles, [L] was elevated, stabilizing (30 s:60 s exercise) or rising progressively (60 s:120 s, 90 s:180 s exercise). In addition, Vco2 and Ve now oscillated with WR, with evidence of delayed RC (progressive increase in Ve — Vco2 slope; decrease in PETCO2) being more marked with longer duty-cycles. These results, which extend earlier findings with supra- θl step and ramp exercise, are not consistent with an appreciable contribution to RC from zero-order central command or peripheral neurogenesis. The reasons for the slow RC kinetics are unclear, but may reflect in part the H+-signal transduction properties of carotid chemoreceptors.

Keywords

Carotid Body Ventilatory Control Lactate Threshold Respiratory Compensation Ramp Exercise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew J. Cathcart
    • 1
  • Anthony P. Turner
    • 2
  • Christopher Butterworth
    • 1
  • Matthew Parker
    • 3
  • John Wilson
    • 1
  • Susan A. Ward
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of Biomedical & Life SciencesUniversity of GlasgowUK
  2. 2.Department of Physical EducationUniversity of EdinburghUK
  3. 3.English Institute of SportManchesterUK
  4. 4.Institute of Membrane & Systems BiologyUniversity of LeedsUK

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