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Neurodevelopmental Abnormalities in the Brainstem of Prenatal Mice Lacking the Prader-Willi Syndrome Gene Necdin

  • Silvia Pagliardini
  • Jun Ren
  • Rachel Wevrick
  • John J. Greer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

Necdin (Ndn) is one of the paternally-expressed genes located on chromosome 15q11–q13, which is deleted in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS). Typical symptoms of this neurodevelopmental disorder are represented by hypotonia, failure to thrive, hyperphagia leading to severe obesity, somatosensory deficits, behavioral problems and mild-to-moderate mental retardation (Goldstone 2004). Further, PWS is associated with respiratory instability in the newborn period, associated with sleep apneas and blunted chemosensitivity (Nixon and Brouilette 2002).

Keywords

Respiratory Rhythm Ventrolateral Medulla Axonal Tract Nucleus Ambiguus Neurodevelopmental Abnormality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Silvia Pagliardini
    • 1
  • Jun Ren
    • 1
  • Rachel Wevrick
    • 2
  • John J. Greer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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