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Superoxide Dismutase-1 Influences the Timing and Post-hypoxic Stability of Neonatal Breathing

  • Kevin J. Cummings
  • Dan Kalf
  • Sherry Moore
  • B. Joan Miller
  • Frank R. Jirik
  • Richard J. A. Wilson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 605)

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) likely play a role in the hypoxic ventilatory response. We determined whether hypoxic responses were influenced by alterations in cellular redox status induced by reductions in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) activity, a cytosolic anti-oxidant enzyme. Using whole-body, continuous-flow plethysmography, we compared ventilatory responses to moderate hypoxia (10% inspired O2) of Sod1 +/+, +/− and −/− postnatal day 4 (P4) littermates. Sod1 +/− neonates exhibited a consistently lower breathing frequency than their wild-type littermates, regardless of inspired O2 level. While SOD-1 deficiency had no effect on the magnitude of the ventilatory response during hypoxia, it did compromise stability of breathing in the post-hypoxic period. Our results suggest SOD-1 stimulates ventilation and helps stabilize breathing after a hypoxic perturbation.

Keywords

Reactive Oxygen Species Carotid Body Ventilatory Response Glomus Cell Expiratory Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin J. Cummings
    • 1
  • Dan Kalf
    • 1
  • Sherry Moore
    • 1
  • B. Joan Miller
    • 2
  • Frank R. Jirik
    • 2
  • Richard J. A. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Hotchkiss Brain InstituteUniversity of CalgaryCalgary, AlbertaCanada
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hotchkiss Brain InstituteUniversity of CalgaryCalgary, AlbertaCanada

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