Advertisement

Panic Disorder in Adolescents

  • Thomas H. Ollendick
  • Donna Pincus
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Keywords

Major Depressive Disorder Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Panic Disorder Anxiety Sensitivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alessi, N. E., & Magen, J. (1988). Panic disorders in psychiatrically hospitalized children. American Journal of Psychiatry, 145, 1450–1452.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. American Psychiatric Association (1994). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  3. American Psychiatric Association (1998). Practice guidelines for the treatment of patients with panic disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 155, 1–34.Google Scholar
  4. Barlow, D. H. (1988). Anxiety and Its Disorders: The Nature and Treatment of Anxiety and Panic. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  5. Barlow, D. H., Gorman, J. M., Shear, M. K., & Woods, S. W. (2000). Cognitive-behavioral therapy, imipramine, or their combination for panic disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association, 283(19), 2529–2536.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Barlow, D. H., & Seidner, A. L. (1983). Treatment of adolescent agoraphobics: Effects on parent-adolescent relations. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 21, 519–526.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Battaglia, M., Bertella, S., Bajo, S., Binaghi, F., & Bellodi, L. (1998). Anticipation of age at onset in panic disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 155, 590–595.Google Scholar
  8. Beck, A. T., & Emery, G. (1985). Anxiety Disorders and Phobias: A Cognitive Perspective. Philadelphia: Center for Cognitive Therapy.Google Scholar
  9. Biederman, J. (1987). Clonazepam in the treatment of prepubertal children with panic-like symptoms. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 48 (Suppl), 38–41.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Biederman, J., Faraone, S. V., Hirshfeld-Becker, D. R., Friedman, D., Robin, J. A., & Rosenbaum, J. F. (2001). Patterns of psychopathology and dysfunction in high-risk children of parents with panic disorder and major depression. American Journal of Psychiatry, 158(1), 49–57.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Biederman, J., Faraone, S. V., Marrs, A., Moore, P., Garcia, J., Ablon, S., et al. (1997). Panic disorder and agoraphobia in consecutively referred children and adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 36, 214–223.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Birmaher, B., & Ollendick, T. H. (2004). Childhood onset panic disorder. In T. H. Ollendick & J. S. March (Eds.), Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Clinician’s Guide to Effective Psychosocial and Pharmacological Interventions. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Birmaher, B., Waterman, G. S., Ryan, N. D., Cully, M., Balach, L., Ingram, J., et al. (1994). Fluoxetine for childhood anxiety disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 33, 993–999.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Brent, D. A., Holder, D., Kolko, D., Birmaher, B., Baugher, M., Roth, C., et al. (1997). A clinical psychotherapy trial for adolescent depression comparing cognitive, family, and supportive therapy. Archives of General Psychiatry, 54, 877–885.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Brent, D. A., Poling, K., McKain, B., & Baugher, M. (1993). A psychoeducational program for families of affectively ill children and adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 32, 770–774.Google Scholar
  16. Chambless, D. L., & Ollendick, T. H. (2001). Empirically supported psychological interventions: Controversies and evidence. Annual Review of Psychology, 52, 685–716.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Clark, D. M. (1996). Panic disorder: From theory to therapy. In P. M. Salkovskis (Ed.), Frontiers of Cognitive Therapy (pp. 318–344). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  18. Clark, D. M., Salkovskis, P. M., & Chalkley, A. J. (1985). Respiratory control as a treatment for panic attacks. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 16, 23–30.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Clark, D. M., Salkovskis, P. M., Hackmann, A., Wells, A., Ludgate, J., & Gelder, M. (1999). Brief cognitive therapy for panic disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 67, 583–589.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Emslie, G. J., Rush, A. J., Weinberg, W. A., Kowatch, R. A., Hughes, C. W., Carmody, T., et al. (1997). A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of fluoxetine in children and adolescents with depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 54, 1031–1037.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Essau, C. A., Conradt, J., & Petermann, F. (1999). Frequency of panic attacks and panic disorder in adolescents. Depression & Anxiety, 9, 19–26.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Essau, C. A., Conradt, J., & Petermann, F. (2000). Frequency, comorbidity, and psychosocial impairment of anxiety disorders in German adolescents. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 14, 263–279.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Fairbanks, J. M., Pine, D. S., Tancer, N. K., Dummit III, E. S., Kentgen, L. M., Asche, B. K., et al. (1997). Open fluoxetine treatment of mixed anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 7, 17–29.Google Scholar
  24. Ginsburg, G. S., & Drake, K. L. (in press). Anxiety sensitivity and panic attack symptomatology among low-income African-American adolescents. Journal of Anxiety Disorders.Google Scholar
  25. Hayward, C., Killen, J. D., Kraemer, H. C., & Barr Taylor, C. (2000). Predictors of panic attacks in adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 39, 207–214.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Hayward, C., Killen, J. D., Kraemer, H. C., Blair-Greiner, A., Strachowski, D., Cunning, D., et al. (1997). Assessment and phenomenology of nonclinical panic attacks in adolescent girls. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 11, 17–32.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Hayward, C., Killen, J. D., & Taylor, C. B. (1989). Panic attacks in young adolescents. American Journal of Psychiatry, 146, 1061–1062.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Kagan, J., Reznick, J. S., & Snidman, N. (1988). Biological bases of childhood shyness. Science, 240, 167–171.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Kazdin, A. E. (2000). Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: Directions for Research and Practice. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Kearney, C. A., Albano, A. M., Eisen, A. R., Allan, W. D., & Barlow, D. H. (1997). The phenomenology of panic disorder in youngsters: An empirical study of a clinical sample. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 11, 49–62.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Kendall, P. C., Flannery-Schroeder, E., Panichelli-Mindel, S., Southam-Gerow, M., Henin, A., & Warman, M. (1997). Therapy for youth with anxiety disorders: A second randomized clinical trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 65, 366–380.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. King, N. J., Gullone, E., Tonge, B. J., & Ollendick, T. H. (1993). Self-reports of panic attacks and manifest anxiety in adolescents. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 31, 111–116.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. King, N. J., Ollendick, T. H., Mattis, S. G., Yang, B., & Tonge, B. (1997). Nonclinical panic attacks in adolescents: Prevalence, symptomatology and associated features. Behaviour Change, 13, 171–183.Google Scholar
  34. Last, C. G., & Strauss, C. C. (1989). Panic disorder in children and adolescents. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 3, 87–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Macaulay, J. L., & Kleinknecht, R. A. (1989). Panic and Panic attacks in adolescents. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23, 349–358.Google Scholar
  36. March, J. S., & Ollendick, T. H. (2004). Integrated psychosocial and pharmacological treatments. In T. H. Ollendick & J. S. March (Eds.). Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Clinician’s Guide to Effective Psychosocial and Pharmacological Interventions. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Mattis, S. G. (2002). Personal communication. Boston University.Google Scholar
  38. Mattis, S. G., & Ollendick, T. H. (1997a). Children’s cognitive responses to the somatic symptoms of panic. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 25, 47–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Mattis, S. G., & Ollendick, T. H. (1997b). Panic in children and adolescents: A developmental analysis. In T. H. Ollendick & R. J. Prinz (Eds.), Advances in Clinical Child Psychology, Vol. 19 (pp. 27–74). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  40. Mattis, S. G., & Ollendick, T. H. (2002). Panic Disorder and Anxiety in Adolescents. London: British Psychological Society.Google Scholar
  41. Mattis, S. G., Pincus, D. B., Ehrenreich, J. T., & Barlow, D. H. (manuscript in preparation). Cognitive behavioral treatment of panic disorder in adolescence.Google Scholar
  42. Moreau, D. L., & Follet, C. (1993). Panic disorder in children and adolescents. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics North America, 2, 581–602.Google Scholar
  43. Moreau, D. L., & Weissman, M. M. (1992). Panic disorder in children and adolescents: A review. American Journal of Psychiatry, 149, 1306–1314.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  44. Muris, P., & Ollendick, T. H. (2005). The role of temperament in the etiology of child psychopathology. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 8, 271–289.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Nelles, W. B., & Barlow, D. H. (1988). Do children panic? Clinical Psychology Review, 8, 359–372.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Ollendick, T. H. (1995). Cognitive-behavioral treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia in adolescents: A multiple baseline design analysis. Behavior Therapy, 26, 517–531.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Ollendick, T. H. (1998). Panic disorder in children and adolescents: New developments, new directions. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 27, 234–245.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Ollendick, T. H., & Hersen, M. (Eds.) (1998). Handbook of Child Psychopathology, 3rd ed. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  49. Ollendick, T. H., & Hirshfeld-Becker, D. R. (2002). The developmental psychopathology of social anxiety disorder. Biological Psychiatry, 51, 44–58.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Ollendick, T. H. & Huntzinger, R. M. (1990). Separation anxiety disorders in children. In M. Hersen & C. G. Last (Eds.), Handbook of Child and Adult Psychopathology: A Longitudinal Perspective (pp. 133–149). New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  51. Ollendick, T. H., & King, N. J. (1998). Empirically supported treatments for children with phobic and anxiety disorders: Current status. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 27, 156–167.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Ollendick, T. H., & King, N. J. (2000). Empirically supported treatments for children and adolescents. In P. C. Kendall (Ed.), Child and Adolescent Therapy: Cognitive-Behavioral Procedures, 2nd ed. (pp. 386–425). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  53. Ollendick, T. H., King, N. J., & Chorpita, B. (2006). Empirically supported treatments for children and adolescents. In P. C. Kendall (Ed.), Child and Adolescent Therapy, 3rd ed. (pp. 492–520). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  54. Ollendick, T. H., Mattis, S. G., & Birmaher, B. (2004). Panic disorder. In T. L. Morris & J. S. March (Eds.), Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents, 2nd ed. (pp. 189–211). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  55. Ollendick, T. H., Mattis, S. G., & King, N. J. (1994). Panic in children and adolescents: A review. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 35, 113–134.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Pincus, D. B., Barlow, D. H., & Spiegel, D. (2004). Eight-Day Intensive Treatment for Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia in Adolescents. Paper presented in the Symposium, Intensive Treatments for Child and Adolescent Anxiety: New Findings (D. Pincus, Chairperson) at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI, August.Google Scholar
  57. Prins, P. M. J., & Ollendick, T. H. (2003). Cognitive change and enhanced coping: Missing mediational links in cognitive behavior therapy with anxiety-disordered children. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 6, 87–105.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Renaud, J., Birmaher, B., Wassick, S. C., & Bridge, J. (1999). Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for the treatment of childhood panic disorder: A pilot study. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 9, 73–83.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Research Units of Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP) Anxiety Group (in press). Flovoxamine for anxiety in children. New England Journal of Medicine.Google Scholar
  60. Silove, D., Manicavasagar, V., Curtis, J., & Blaszczynski, A. (1996). Is early separation anxiety a risk factor for adult panic disorder?: A critical review. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 37, 167–179.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Simeon, J., Ferguson, B., Knott, V., Roberts, N., Gauthier, B., Dubois, C., & Wiggins, D. (1992). Clinical, cognitive and neurophysiological effects of alprazolam in children with overanxious and avoidant disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 31, 29–33.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Spiegel, D. A., & Barlow, D. H. (2000). Eight-day treatment of panic disorder with moderate to severe agoraphobia: Preliminary outcome data. Poster presented at the 34th Meeting of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  63. Strauss, J., Birmaher, B., Bridge, J., Axelson, D., Chiappetta, L., Brent, D., & Ryan, N. (2000). Anxiety disorders in suicidal youth. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry—Revue Canadienne de Psychiatrie, 45(8),739–745.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  64. Thyer, B. A., Parrish, R. T., Curtis, G. C., Nesse, R. M., & Cameron, O. G. (1985). Ages of onset of DSM-III anxiety disorders. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 26, 113–122.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Toth, S. L., & Cicchetti, D. (1999). Developmental psychopathology and child psychotherapy. In S. W. Russ & T. H. Ollendick (Eds.), Handbook of Psychotherapies with Children and Families. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.Google Scholar
  66. Weissman, M. M., Bland, R. C., Canino, G. J., Faravelli, C., Greenwald, S., Hwu, H., et al. (1997). The Cross-National Epidemiology of Panic Disorder Study. Archives of General Psychiatry, 54, 305–309.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  67. World Health Organization (1992). International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas H. Ollendick
    • 1
  • Donna Pincus
    • 2
  1. 1.Child Study Center, Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  2. 2.Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders, Department of PsychologyBoston UniversityBoston

Personalised recommendations