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Adoption of Evidence-Based Treatments in Community Settings: Obstacles and Opportunities

  • Julianne M. Smith-Boydston
  • Timothy D. Nelson
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Keywords

Mental Health Service Community Setting Juvenile Offender Client Outcome Training Plan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julianne M. Smith-Boydston
    • 1
  • Timothy D. Nelson
    • 2
  1. 1.Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center
  2. 2.University of Kansas, Clinical Child Psychology Program

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