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Client, Therapist, and Treatment Characteristics in EBTs for Children and Adolescents

  • Stephen Shirk
  • Dana McMakin
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Keywords

Adolescent Psychiatry Parent Training Conduct Disorder Adolescent Depression Behavioral Parent Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Shirk
    • 1
  • Dana McMakin
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Denver

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